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From How to use "Other Than"?

The digital age has given today's libraries new means of storing and retrieving information on media other than the printed pages.

'the printed pages' is apparently not 'new means'. So, 'other' in this sentence, in my opinion, may have the meaning of 'otherwise' corresponding to 'new'.

Then, generalizing the analyse from abve to

This is a paraphrase:

Direct object arguments are associated with a wide range of semantic roles, but in canonical clauses other than those expressing agent–patient situations, the direct object has the same grammatical properties as the NP expressing the patient in agent–patient clauses.

The original is

Direct object arguments are associated with a wide range of semantic roles, but in other canonical clauses than those expressing agent–patient situations, the direct object has the same grammatical properties as the NP expressing the patient in agent–patient clauses.[Rodney Huddleston Geoffrey K Pullum. (2017). The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language. p.245.]

'other' may have the meaning of 'otherwise' corresponding to 'canonical', hence 'non-canonical'.

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    Where did you see the first sentence? It seems to contain a typo... please provide a link.
    – JavaLatte
    Feb 5 at 8:11
  • 1
    Where does the "those" in the title of your question come into it? What exactly is your question? And where did the inset quote come from?
    – BillJ
    Feb 5 at 8:11
  • The answer is no. "those expressing agent–patient situations" are also canonical.
    – BillJ
    Feb 5 at 8:40
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    The new (digital) methods of storing information are different from the printed page. Feb 5 at 8:43
  • @BillJ Does the paraphrase leave it open that 'those' may be 'non-canonical', whereas the original must be 'canonical' ?
    – Mr. Wang
    Feb 5 at 8:51

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