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Kate stayed in London for three days.

Lara stayed in London for three days.

We can say

Lara stayed in London for as many days as Kate did.

But if I use 'in London' in a different position in the sentence, must we put all the parts between the two as's?!

Lara stayed for as many days in London as Kate.

Or can we say:

Lara stayed for as many days as Kate in London.

Are the two sentences equally correct and mean the same thing or is one preferred by native speakers with different meanings? And if one is preferred, is there a reason why?

Thank you.

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    They all mean the same, but the last two are difficult to understand, and therefore unnatural, because they break up the phrase stayed in London which is what the sentence is about. Feb 12 at 9:22

1 Answer 1

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It is possible. I assume you first establish that Kate stayed in Paris. As "in London" contrasts with this, I would want to move it forwards in the sentence as early as possible.

Kate stayed for three days in Paris. Lara stayed in London for as many days.

It is possible, but it seems unnecessary. You could express the same idea in ways that don't force the listener to do any back-references.

Kate and Lara both took three-day holidays in Europe. Kate went to Paris, but Lara went to London.

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  • Thanks. I understand that there are other ways. I was just wondering how the structure as many ... as actually works. So both " Lara stayed for as many days in London as Kate" and "Lara stayed for as many days as Kate in London." sound grammatically correct to you, right? Feb 12 at 7:21
  • Well, not really, because you need to use the ability of "in london" to move forward to make the contrast. Otherwise it seems you are comparing the number of days that Kate was in London (ie 0) and saying "Lara stayed for 0 days in London".
    – James K
    Feb 12 at 7:24
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    But always remember. You use grammar to make meaning. Never learn by starting with a grammatical construction and trying to think how to use it. Always start with what you want to communicate and choose the best grammar to express that. Here the "as many as" construction is not the best.
    – James K
    Feb 12 at 7:26
  • I'm actually comparing the number of days. I made a mistake and typed Paris. But yes, I'm comparing the number of days. Lara stayed in London for three days. Kate stayed in London for three days. So Lara stayed for as many days in London as Kate. Right? Feb 12 at 7:28
  • No, for pity's sake look at my answer! "Lara stayed in London, for as many days" You need to move the contrasting phrase forward or it means "Lara stayed for zero days in London."
    – James K
    Feb 12 at 7:30

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