4

While checking students´ answers of the midterm exams, I found out various answers and I wonder if it´s grammatically correct. Could you please check if these answers can be possible?

★ The right answer is: Minsu, my best friend, is very kind. and those are the answers of my students...

  1. Minsu my best friend is very kind. (he did't write comma)
  2. Minsu, my best friend is very kind.(he only wrote one comma)

★ The right answer is: Would you say that(it) again? and those are the answers of my students...

  1. Would you say again please?
  2. Would you please talk again?
  3. Would you say me again?
  4. Would you say onemore time?(he wrote 'one more' without any space)
  5. Would you speak to me?
  6. Would you speak to again?
  7. Would you tell me what?
  8. Would you tell me again?
  9. Would you say to again?
  10. Would you say me again?
  11. Would you speak that again?
  12. Would you tell that again?

★ The right answer is: My favorite color is blue. and those are the answers of my students...

  1. My favorite color is blue most.
  2. My favorite color is blue color.
  3. My favorite color is blue in most.
  4. My favorite color is like blue.
  5. My favorite color is like blue color.

★ The right answer is: I have seen many plays.

  1. I have watched many plays.
  2. I have been many plays.

closed as off-topic by Nigel Harper, user3169, ColleenV, snailboat, Hellion Oct 5 '14 at 0:08

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  • 2
    There's nothing wrong with "I have watched many plays". – Peter Shor Oct 4 '14 at 16:46
  • 1
    I have been to many plays. Maybe partial credit :-) – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 4 '14 at 16:52
  • 1
    "Would you tell me again?" is a well-formed English request: I've forgotten the street address. Would you tell me again? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 4 '14 at 16:54
  • 1
    And Blue-4 is like totes cromulent, dude, if they're supposed to be mastering the vernacular. – StoneyB Oct 4 '14 at 17:26
  • 1
    "my best fried" should be "my best friend". I hope this is a typo. – Jasper Oct 4 '14 at 22:01
1

(1). Would you say again please?

say tends to require an object. (Would you say that again please)

(2). Would you please talk again?

(5). Would you speak to me?

This could be correct, but it has slightly different meaning: Would you say something/participate in a dialog

(3). Would you say me again?

(10). Would you say me again?

me here implies that tell should be used, not say. (Would you tell me again)

(4). Would you say onemore time?(he wrote 'one more' without any space)

onemore is incorrect. And an object is desirable (Would you say it one more time)

(6). Would you speak to again?

(9). Would you say to again?

to doesn't agree to again.

(8). Would you tell me again?

Looks to be correct.

(11). Would you speak that again?

Rather incorrect. say should be here.

(12). Would you tell that again?

Incorrect, tell requires me. say would be perfect here.

Example with say and speak

  • 1
    "Would you speak to me?" is grammatically correct, but does not mean "Please repeat that." Instead, it means "Would you talk to me?" or "Are we on speaking terms?" – Jasper Oct 4 '14 at 21:49
  • Could you please comment on the 7th one? – sshilovsky Oct 4 '14 at 22:04
  • 1
    "Would you tell me what?" sounds like either "Would you tell me... What?" or the start of "Would you tell me what you mean?" So it is not correct as written, but a native speaker might interpret it more-or-less correctly. The listener might think the person thought it was unbelievable, instead of just hard-to-hear. – Jasper Oct 4 '14 at 22:11
  • Thank you so much. I really appreciate your detailed comments! – joy Oct 5 '14 at 8:18
1

(1). My favorite color is blue most.

(3). My favorite color is blue in most.

Rather incorrect. I doubt what most is intended to mean here. In most could possibly mean at most.

(2). My favorite color is blue color.

Maybe correct, but not perfect. The second color is redundant.

(4). My favorite color is like blue.

Correct if like means similar to.

(5). My favorite color is like blue color.

Has the issues of both 2 and 4.

  • I think you meant "The second color is redundant." (Abundant means "plentiful", and is a good thing; redundant means "excessive", and is a bad thing.) – Jasper Oct 4 '14 at 21:55
  • @Jasper, thx, fixed both :) – sshilovsky Oct 4 '14 at 22:00
  • I think your comment on (5) would be clearer if you said "has the issues of both 2 and 4". – Jasper Oct 4 '14 at 22:05

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