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The sentence is: Raw results give a cloud of points where the main tendencies can already be seen, but which is hardly interpretable.

Should I remove the "which" or the "which is", by which I assume it will be more simple.

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  • "tendencies" is plural, "is" is singular. You'd need "are". "Which" can stay but removing it would be clearer. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 6 '14 at 3:11
  • All right, so you mean the "which" must stay? – Ping Tang Oct 6 '14 at 3:13
  • Can stay, if you like. Or can go. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 6 '14 at 3:14
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    If it is the cloud of points that is hardly interpretable, then the sentence is correct as it stands. However, whether that is what you meant or you meant that the raw results are hardly interpretable, your best bet is to split the sentence into two sentences. – Drew Oct 6 '14 at 4:33
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If you use which is, then which must refer to cloud because cloud and is are both singular. But is feels awkward in the sentence because is is closer to the noun tendencies than to cloud. Which are would be easier to read.

However, which feels stiff and unnecessarily formal in this sentence. I would suggest this alternative: Raw results give a cloud of points where the main tendencies can already be seen, but are hardly interpretable. This eliminates the formal which, and both tendencies and are are plural.

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  • well, i think so – Ping Tang Oct 6 '14 at 4:50
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It depends on what is "hardly interpretable". It could either be "a cloud of points" or "the main tendencies". If it is "the main tendencies", kevinbatchcom offers a good option to rephrase. If, however, it is "a cloud of points", then the original sentence is correct, but not easy to read. I would suggest to split it in two: Raw results give a cloud of points where the main tendencies can already be seen. However, this representation is hardly interpretable.

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