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Imagine someone is very critical of themselves, and he/she thinks, "I am too fat, I am too short, I am too this and too that etc.", whereas they are not. And you want to boost their confidence and you say just the opposite of what they think they are.

So, I would like to say something like the following sentences, however I can't be sure whether the last part in bold sounds all right:

1- You're not too fat, you're not too short, you're not too whatever you think you are.

2- You're not too fat, you're not too short, you're not too anything you think you are.

3- You're not too fat, you're not too short, you're not too much of anything you think you are.

Which one of these, if any, would sound idiomatic?

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    They are idiomatic in conversation with a friend. Also, you're not too bah blah. Not too yada yada yada. Mar 20 at 21:34
  • In a conversational context, you could get away with "You're not too fill-in-the-blank you think you are!" Mar 21 at 2:19
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    All are OK, but 2 seems the most natural because of lots of phrases along the lines of "You can be anything you want to be". "Anything" is also more emphatic than "whatever": the former suggests that it encompasses everything, while "whatever" is often used to refer specifically to something stupid or easy to dismiss.
    – Stuart F
    Mar 21 at 9:39
  • Reality: The person is overweight and shorter than average. What the person wants to hear: "You're not too fat, you're not too short, you're perfect as you are.”
    – Mari-Lou A
    Mar 22 at 8:44

1 Answer 1

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You're not too fat, you're not too short, you're not too whatever you think you are. - This is grammatically correct, but "whatever" feels a little vague.

You're not too fat, you're not too short, you're not too anything you think you are. - This is the most idiomatic option.

You're not too fat, you're not too short, you're not too much of anything you think you are. - "Too much" works grammatically, but IMO, the previous option (anything) is still better.

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