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I am having confusion over "over":

1a The mouse pointer was moved over the Internet Explorer icon.
1b The mouse pointer was moved to over the Internet Explorer icon.
2a An airplane moved over the city.
2b An airplane moved to over the city.
3a A dark cloud moved over the city.
3b A dark cloud moved to over the city.

Are the b-sentences, formed by adding "to" between "moved" and "over", more clear than the a-sentences, because there is some confusion over the preposition "over" in another thread?

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    Here, moved to over [anything] does not natural, at least to me. Also, good to learn mouse hover as well. – Maulik V Oct 7 '14 at 4:45
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    @meatie, did you mean to ask about the possible use of the words "moved over to"? This reordering would make 1b, 2b and 3b grammatical, although not quite idiomatic. – xris Nov 6 '14 at 4:58
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My personal interpretation:

  • “The mouse pointer was moved over the Internet Explorer icon.” means “The mouse pointer was moved in front of the Internet Explorer icon.” (i.e., partially obscuring the icon), e.g.,
                                                   
  • “The mouse pointer was moved to over the Internet Explorer icon.” might mean “The mouse pointer was moved to a location literally above the Internet Explorer icon.”, e.g.,
                                                   

But

  • “(a physical object) moved over the city.” and “(a physical object) moved to over the city.” might be taken to mean the same thing.  But
    • moved over the city.” might mean “passed over the city.” (i.e., moved overhead and kept on going), while
    • moved to over the city.” might mean “moved to a position over the city.” (i.e.,“moved overhead and stopped.”)

But I find the moved to over sequence awkward.  I would hardly ever use it, and I don’t think I’ve ever heard it.

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