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I'm confused, with those sentences, first I thought I should use GRANTS in all, but in second thought I'm not sure what is the subject of those sentences.

Is the word "completing" / "submitting" here the subject of the sentence to which the verb form should refer?

In the first sentence, it's clear, regardless, the subject of the sentence is "completing" or "quest", it's all singular. But in the rest, I'm not sure. I would choose form grants, because I think the subject is "completing" in this specific case.

Can somebody tell me what should I use, plural or singular form of verb in those sentences?


Completing this quest grants an achievement.

Completing both versions of this quest [grants or grant] an achievement.

Completing this quest 5 times [grants or grant] an achievement.

Submitting all 5 items in this quest [grants or grant] an achievement.

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    Always the singular. The completion is a single action, no matter how many steps are needed. Commented Mar 26 at 21:46

1 Answer 1

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I add to what @Michael Harvey said.

We use the singular in all the OP's examples.

Completing both versions of this quest grants an achievement.

I add more examples:

Completing [the original version of this quest and the revised version] grants an achievement.

but

[Completing the original version] and [repeating the procedure in the revised version] grant an achievement.

We use plural because there are now two gerund-participle phrases.

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  • Marrying ten women makes me a criminal; saving ten babies from drowning makes me a hero. Commented Mar 27 at 22:05

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