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Overall, these data support the hypothesis that the UK will see an older population after half a century, which is the result of increases in the proportion of elderly people in each member nation.

I often see people calling a country "a member nation" if it is in an economic or military group like NATO or the UN, but I'm not sure about the UK case.

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    Yes, absolutely. It is acceptable and normal to say or write that Scotland, England, Wales and Northern Ireland are 'member nations' of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. An alternative phrase might be 'constituent nations [of the UK]'. Commented Apr 1 at 9:02
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    Yes, but you should be aware that treating 'data' as a plural is increasing seen as old-fashioned and mainly done by people who wish that English were Latin. Commented Apr 1 at 9:28
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    Aren't the projections themselves the hypothesis? How do they support the hypothesis?
    – TimR
    Commented Apr 1 at 10:55
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    Proofreading texts is off-topic but you have identified a specific problem. However there is more than one inaccuracy in your written text. Here's a question for you: do we say normally say "(the) increases proportion of people" or "an increase proportion of people“?
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented Apr 1 at 10:56
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    What @TimR said. I'd say the cited utterance is complete nonsense - the chart is a projection, not data (singular or plural). You can't meaningfully say a projection of future values "supports the hypothesis" that those projected future values will in fact come about. Commented Apr 1 at 11:48

1 Answer 1

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Overall, these data support the hypothesis that the countries of the UK will see an older population a half century from now as the result of increases in the percentage of seniors in each country.
OR
Overall, these data support the hypothesis that the countries of the UK (England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) will see an older population a half century from now as the result of increases in the percentage of seniors in each country.

OR the countries can go under the chart, for example. OR increase in the senior population percentages in each country

older population OR seniors

Yes, the countries of the UK: [countries of the United Kingdom] 1https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Countries_of_the_United_Kingdom//which is the result of increases in the proportion of elderly people in each member nation=as the result of increases in the percentage of seniors + elderly people is not what is used in statistics, I think.

Personally, I would not use member nation. It's very identified with the UN system or things like ASEAN or NATO. [I am not saying it is an outright mistake.] However, elderly people is not a good term here.

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  • Could you tell me what's wrong with "elderly people"? Commented Apr 1 at 17:06
  • prb.org/resources/fact-sheet-aging-in-the-united-states older Americans (those 65 or older) OR seniors. Elderly people is not a "professional" term and also does not mean those 65 or 60 and older. It's basically very old people. The OECD uses the term, others do not.
    – Lambie
    Commented Apr 1 at 17:11
  • Senior population of the U.S. by state 2021 statista.com/statistics/736211/…
    – Lambie
    Commented Apr 1 at 17:16
  • There are other sources like 1 and 2, which say otherwise. Commented Apr 1 at 17:17
  • The first one I already mentioned and the second is about defining elderly. The WHO says older people. NOT elderly.
    – Lambie
    Commented Apr 1 at 17:22

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