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I used the following sentence.

(2.1)"These fashion models continued to grow weights, making it for them to be less popular"

And the a world-renowned scholar (chatgpt) said it is grammatically wrong or awkward. and it recommends the following expression.

(2.2)"These fashion models continued to grow weights, making them less popular"

Is this(2.1) really grammatically wrong.?

EDIT: First question is deleted, as each thread wants only one question.

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  • Is They crossed the border also part of the 2nd pair of examples? Apr 3 at 7:27
  • 1
    I’m voting to close this question because it is asking to proofread the output of a bot. Apr 3 at 7:55
  • You should try and understand the sentences and explain what you think is the issue. This counts as "doing research".
    – Stuart F
    Apr 3 at 9:07
  • Not exactly, but similar sentence should be before 2nd pairs. Apr 3 at 13:30
  • Such as "These models continued to grow weights, making them less popular" Apr 3 at 13:35

1 Answer 1

1

1.1 They crossed the border, making them difficult to access each other.

1.2... making it difficult for them to access each other.

2.1... making it for them to be less popular

2.2... making them less popular

1.2 We look at the sentence construction first before the meaning. The understood subject of the participle clause making it difficult for them to access each other is the main clause They crossed the border. This sentence could also be phrased as

They crossed the border, which makes it difficult for them to access each other.

The sentence is grammatical but has doubtful meaning. The sentence logically means the people crossed together to the other side. So why does the act of crossing make it difficult for these people to access each other? (This may be possible if the communication control (under some dictatorship) is tight or telecommunications network is poor there, but I don't know whether this is the OP's intended meaning.)

We could say making it difficult for them to access (or contact) their loved ones on the other side of the border.

1.1 This sentence has similar problems as 1.2 and more.

... making them difficult to access each other

is unnatural. It means now the people have become unreasonable.

ADJECTIVE B2 Someone who is difficult behaves in an unreasonable and unhelpful way.

Also, the infinitive to access each other just can't fit into this bizarre construction.

For the second pair of examples, assuming They crossed the border is not part of them,

2.1 This doesn’t make sense.

2.2 This looks fine so far.

If we assume They crossed the border is part of this sentence, it's fine too.

They crossed the border, making them less popular.

Edit for Consistency with the OP's Revised Question

We say gain weight rather than grow weights.

(2.2)These models continued to gain weight, making them less popular.

The gerund-participial construction means the same as the relative clause one:

(2.2)These models continued to gain weight, which makes them less popular.

The relative clause is of the form Make + object + adjective complement.

(2.1) doesn't work:

(2.1) *These models continued to gain weight, making it for them to be less popular.

A slight modification would make it work:

These models continued to [gain weight], making it [hard] for them to be [ ] popular.

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  • There's a lot that's helpful here, but I'm not sure whether it's helpful to the OP. It has to do a lot of guessing about the intended meaning and context. I'd suggest that it's best to wait until a question is clear before answering. Apr 3 at 21:23
  • Thank, @Andy Bonner. You're right. Apr 4 at 2:44

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