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According to Cambridge dictionary, we use any to mean ‘it does not matter which or what’. We use this meaning of any with all types of nouns and usually in affirmative sentences.
In speaking we often stress any:

[talking about a contract for new employees]
Do we have any form of agreement with new staff when they start? (+ singular countable noun)

However, any also refers to indefinite or unknown quantities, especially in questions and negative sentences. So the sentence seems to show the speaker is not sure whether there is any form of agreement with new staff. I'd like to figure out what exactly it shows when any is stressed here and how to tell the difference between these two forms in this case.

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    This is the same construction as "Do we have any bread?". I'm not sure what is confusing you here. In the example the noun phrase is "form of agreement with new staff when they start". It's a very long noun phrase. Is that what is confusing you here? Your understanding I think is correct. They don't know if there is such an agreement, which is why they are asking. Don't read too much into this. There is no deeper understanding that you are missing.
    – Billy Kerr
    Apr 19 at 12:17
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    As a native speaker, I don't really understand the distinction they make between 'strong' and 'weak' forms, or how the examples they give are different. Apr 19 at 12:52
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    You can stress "any" or leave it unstressed. If you said "Do we have any cheese?" it would mean that you expected there to be cheese but are now annoyed because there doesn't seem to be the least bit of cheese. While "Do we have any cheese?" would be a neutral question not expecting a particular answer. You can tell the difference by tone of voice or context (e.g. what you previously know about the presence of cheese and the speaker's desire for cheese). Is that what you mean?
    – Stuart F
    Apr 19 at 13:30
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    Dictionaries are often not very good at describing usage. I think they perhaps mean situations such as: Q: Which pizza would you like? Marguerita or the Peperoni? A: Any pizza will do, thanks. This means it does not matter which. But that is not what is going on in your example sentence.
    – Billy Kerr
    Apr 19 at 15:11
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    This usage of "any" is used when giving someone a choice of things, and the person replying is saying that they don't have a preferrence, they don't mind which one. So, you would know the meaning of "any" here from the context.
    – Billy Kerr
    Apr 19 at 15:22

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