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There is an additional rule called V2 in main clauses, which moves the finite (inflected for subject) verb into the second position in the sentence.

'' which '' refers to which of these ? usually it should replace the word closest to it, but it didn't make much sense here ? I always get confused in such sentences. if you can help me, I would appreciate it.

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  • The relative clause is a non-defining one, so it refers to the whole noun phrase "an additional rule called V2 in main clauses"
    – BillJ
    Apr 20 at 9:02

2 Answers 2

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The relative pronoun "which" refers to "rule"

The structure here is a noun phrase, headed by the noun "rule" with a number of pre- and post-modifiers. There is the adjective "additional" before the noun. After the noun there are: a participle phrase "called V2", prepositional phrase "in main clauses" and a relative "which moves the finite verb ...." Each one of these elements adds some information about the noun.

Of course "V2" is just the name of the rule, so in describing the rule you are also describing "V2". Indeed you are describing an additional rule called "V2" in main clauses.

I wonder why you don't think that the relative clause modifies the noun "clauses", as that is the closest.

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  • Yeah, I thought about that part too, I just forgot to mention it. then I can translate such sentences by considering the context of the sentence and the defining elements of the antecedent. You explained it very well and changed my point of view. thank you very much. it is usually mentioned as the closest in the books, but there are exceptions.
    – emilywenly
    Apr 20 at 7:40
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    Hopefully the reason OP doesn't think that the relative clause modifies the noun "clauses" is because clauses is plural, but the relevant verb is singular moves. Apr 20 at 11:23
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The relative pronoun which has antecedent rule.

The OP's example means

There is an additional rule called V2 in main clauses, [and the rule] moves the finite (inflected for subject) verb into the second position in the sentence.

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