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I found several sentences using this phrase, such as:

  • Physical activity can help, as can trying to relax your body – if we are tense it often causes us to tense our shoulders, for example.
  • Isolation magnifies negative emotions like loneliness, as can trying to ignore or repress them.
  • Trying to drive a nail with a screw driver can be very frustrating, as can trying to turn a Phillips head screw with a hammer.
  • Some places, an unauthorized use of nmap can be considered a crime, as can trying to break into systems for security (non-malicious) purposes.
  • etc.

How should I interpret the meaning of that phrase correctly?

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as can be a conjunction that means: in the way that: Cambridge Dictionary

So: Physical activity can help, as can trying to relax your body – if we are tense it often causes us to tense our shoulders, for example.

means:

Physical activity can help, as trying to relax your body can – if we are tense it often causes us to tense our shoulders, for example.
OR
Physical activity can help, in the way that trying to relax your body can – if we are tense it often causes us to tense our shoulders, for example.

All four examples given by work that way.

trying to relax the body is a gerund phrase. The test for that is that it can act like a noun phrase and subject of a sentence: Trying to relax the body is a good thing.

Please note: this pattern as [can] (modal) [noun phrase] OR as [noun phrase] can can be used with other modals or be verbs. Sometimes, the noun phrase is just a word.

Here are a few: Drawing blue flowers is fun as is drawing yellow ones.
The door should be grey as should the rest of the wall.
The noise must stop as must your complaints about it.
They may well like the project as may their superiors. You should leave as should he. I might come as might she. [a bit old fashioned] Physical activity might help as might tea.

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