0

Can I paraphase:

Jeep was approaching me at high speed.

With:

Jeep was coming at me at high speed.

Saw usage: to come to somebody, but never to come at somebody (in the meaning to approach somebody).

  • 3
    If the jeep is coming at you, it implies that it is going to hit you. If it is merely approaching, that may be coincidental, or you may expect it to stop for you. – oerkelens Oct 8 '14 at 7:23
  • wonderful point. @oerkelens this makes it a good answer. – Maulik V Oct 8 '14 at 7:58
  • I'd not prefer using approaching with a vehicle. – Maulik V Oct 8 '14 at 8:00
  • @MaulikV I agree with you. – Denis Kulagin Oct 8 '14 at 8:07
1

If something (in this case a jeep) is coming at you, it implies that it is going to hit you.

If it is merely approaching you, it is coming closer, but it doesn't imply anything else. You may be expecting it to stop for you, for instance.

Coming at someone means approaching to hit, to attack:

The car came at him at a ridiculous speed. he'd better run away!
She came at me with a knife. she is attacking me!

Coming to someone is a lot more peaceful:

The car came to him at a ridiculous speed. but then it stopped and he got it
She came to me with a knife. which I asked her to bring me

1

The statement "Jeep was approaching me at high speed." cannot be rephrased as "Jeep was coming at me at high speed." because the second statement has the latent meaning to either kill you or hurt you.

The phrase "coming at someone/something" shows the intent to hurt someone/something as if that person/thing has made you angry and now you want to take revenge.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.