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On Discovery TV channel the action was happening somewhere in Alaska. I heard the expression that the “aircraft is in a window” which means that it must be inspected before taking off to a particular destination.

I wonder if this expression (to be in a window, having the meaning of being inspected) can be extended to some other fields of activity, for example can I say:

This car is in a window now;

Or:

An authority is going to examine tomorrow our company’s documents, so we (our company) will be in a window.

Another question related to this subject would be about the usage of the noun inspection instead of the verb to inspect. In this case what verb would go with the noun inspection?

X undertakes an inspection;

X faces an inspection;

X bears an inspection;

X takes an inspection;

X receives an inspection etc.

Which verb of the above (or maybe others) is suitable ?

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    in a window means inspected? What use is that? Never heard of! – Maulik V Oct 8 '14 at 10:05
  • @MaulikV, at least in Alaska. – Lucian Sava Oct 8 '14 at 10:16
  • I agree with Maulik. To be "in a window" is not an idiom that means "awaiting inspection". I think you may have dropped a few words, Lucian. I can imagine a context where the phrase "time window" was used on a show about Alaska, where the (maritime) weather can change abruptly. "We had a narrow time window in which the plane had to be inspected before we could take off, as a storm front was coming in." – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 8 '14 at 14:00
  • Maybe a "window of opportunity"? – user3169 Oct 8 '14 at 16:27
  • I can’t have any choice but to incline to your opinion. In my language there is a saying: when one tells you are drunk send them to get some sleep. But, if two people tell you are drunk then you’d better go to sleep. Since in my case three people say that, even though it’s frustrating, I’d better go to sleep. – Lucian Sava Oct 9 '14 at 6:45
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"A window" can refer to a time window (a period of available time), but it's not necessarily a window for inspection. It might be a time window for anything. You have to say what.

With a bit of background and context, it would be ok to say:

Our inspection window starts tomorrow.

meaning that the time during which you could be inspected begins tomorrow.

A 'time window' in general is "An interval or opportunity for action".

A "launch window" is the time period during which a spacecraft can be launched, e.g.:

Apollo launch opportunities in 1968 that provide a 1-3-5 day launch window

Re your examples:

X undertakes an inspection;

OK. X is doing the inspecting.

X faces an inspection;

OK. X is being inspected.

X bears an inspection;

Not OK.

X takes an inspection;

Not OK.

X receives an inspection

OK. X is being inspected.

  • 1
    I thank you so much for your answer and comment, useful and comforting. – Lucian Sava Nov 10 '14 at 7:16
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X faces an inspection. X awaits inspection. X is the thing or person being inspected.

To undertake an inspection means "to inspect".

  • Thank you for showing the use of verbs, for me it’s very useful. – Lucian Sava Oct 9 '14 at 6:46

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