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John's life has been hectic recently, so he's driven to a remote village to take a break from city life. Peter, an inhabitant of that village, sees John's car. As John steps out of the car, Peter approaches him. They have the following conversation:

Peter: "Hey, what brought you to this remote village?"

John: "Well, the reason I came here is because I want to disconnect from the hustle and bustle of city life and immerse myself in nature."

Peter: "That sounds like a peaceful escape. I hope you find the tranquility you are looking for."

Is the simple past "brought" and "came" used correctly in the dialog I made up? If so, I wonder if it's correct to follow the word "came" with the simple present "is" and "want" the way I have done. Thank you.

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    Unless John has been living in the village for some time, I'd say it would be more idiomatic for Peter to ask What brings you to this remote village? Especially if this is the first time the villager has encountered the newcomer. But it's fine for Peter to respond using Past Tense for the reason I came here, even if he's only just arriving (because he's already there at time of speaking. I'm not keen on your disconnect (I suggest get away from), but the rest is fine. You might usefully discard the words because I want though (they add nothing useful). Commented May 21 at 15:30
  • But I don't understand exactly what it is about your text that you're unsure of. Are you just asking about whether to write the reason is... or the reason was... ? And I suppose John could have said ...because I wanted to disconnect... Is that what the question is all about? Commented May 21 at 15:33
  • ...if so, maybe it's a duplicate of Should I say "the reason is" or "the reason was"? Commented May 21 at 15:38
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    Not a fan of the reason is because, I'd use "The reason I came here is that I wanted to disconnect." Commented May 21 at 15:41
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    @YosefBaskin: I think that ship has sailed! Railing against the reason is because is increasingly getting shoved in the same bucket as poking fun at don't end a sentence with a preposition. Besides death and taxes, the one other thing we can be certain of is that language changes. Commented May 21 at 15:49

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You can use both the simple present and past tense in the subordinate clause here.

Or, 1) "Well, the reason I came here is because I want to disconnect from the hustle and bustle of city life and immerse myself in nature." - I want to disconnect is taken as a general truth.

Another example: Many ancient people believed that the Sun revolves around the earth.

  1. "Well, the reason I came here is because I wanted to disconnect from the hustle and bustle of city life and immerse myself in nature."

Here, he wanted it (earlier action).

More examples:

I wanted to go home because I missed my parents.

She knew she had made the right choice.

We will wait here until they have finished/they finish. [future in main clause, present perfect/present in subordinate clause.

When the main clause's verb is not in the past or the past perfect tense, the verb of the subordinate clause can be in any tense that conveys meaning. When the main verb is in the past or past perfect, the verb in the subordinate clause has to be in the past or past perfect. The exception is when the subordinate clause expresses what is commonly known as a general truth:

I hope it is helpful.

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