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  1. The AI detector flagged the article as having over 50% AI-generated content.

  2. The AI detector flagged the article for having over 50% AI-generated content.

Are both these sentences grammatically correct? How do these sentences differ in meaning?

1
  • We're going to need a new dictionary entry under replicant: "The AI-detector flagged the article as replicant."
    – TimR
    Commented May 24 at 18:31

3 Answers 3

3

To me, the likely meanings / contexts are different...

1: The article was flagged as [being X]

... implies flagging = labeling in the context of a classification exercise. Every article is assigned to a category (X, Y, Z, or whatever).
Flagging is for type.

2: The article was flagged for [being X]

... implies flagging = highlighting in the context of a validation exercise. Only articles needing further attention (because they're X, Y, Z,...) are flagged.
Flagging is for reason.


Thus in OP's example #1, other articles might be "flagged / classified" as having 25% or 75% AI-generated content. In example #2, other articles might be "flagged / rejected" for being inaccurate or offensive or whatever.

2

I would say that (1) is more idiomatic. You flag something (mark it for attention) as having (because it has) a certain quality.

You flag something for a particular person's attention rather than for a quality that it has.

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They are both correct but with different meanings.

  1. "as having" - A flag was set which signals that the article has over 50% AI content. The fact that this flag is set means that it has over 50% AI content.

  2. "for having" - A general flag (e.g. a warning) was set because the article has over 50% AI content, but this flag itself does not necessarily mean that it has over 50% AI content.

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