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I have a difficulty with "the more... the more..." structure.

I am not sure the following sentence is the right use of the structure.

The more satisfied you are with your job, the more effort you could put into your work.

I assume everyone knows what I am trying to say. It is the right use of the structure?

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The Parallel rule states that the verb should have the same tense is a sentence which is referring to the same subject.

Here "JOB" and "WORK" are referring to the same subject. Hence, the verb could should instead be replaced by can or might not be used at all since the sentence is in present tense.

Don't get confused by the "ed" of satisfied. "SATISFIED" here is used as ADJECTIVE, and the verb of the subject follows "satisfied you ARE" which is present tense. Hence, in the second part of the sentence, either do not use any verb or use can, both of which make the statement present tense.

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