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"That's the idea that if you make the consumer uncomfortable enough and then tell them that for money we'll make you less uncomfortable, then you will give us money."

It is an excerpt from an NPR News article about how mobile phone game companies make customers make additional purchases in the games themselves.

My question is, in the sentence above, what does "for money" mean? more specifically, what does "for" mean here? And could you give me other examples of the same use of for ?

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Ditto @ShantanuChandra. I add that it isn't necessarily an "exchange". There's a common slogan, "You can't get X for love or money", meaning, people won't give you X in exchange for money, nor will they give it to you because they like or love you.

BTW I think that sentence is a little awkward because it shifts in referring to the consumer from "them" to "you". I would have written it, "That's the idea that if you make the consumer uncomfortable enough and then tell them that for money we'll make you less uncomfortable, then THEY will give us money." The "we'll make you less uncomfortable" is part of an indirect quote, so as it is addressing the consumer, "you" refers to the consumer. Fine. But "then you will give us money" is not part of the quote. I don't think the intent is that the company says to the consumer, "We'll do this and then you will give us money", but rather that the company tells the consumer that it will make him less uncomfortable, end of quote, and then the result of this is that the consumer gives the company money.

  • I found the article here, wnpr.org/post/…. It's quite clear that the editor there agrees with you about the "[they]". – Damkerng T. Oct 10 '14 at 14:14
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"for money" simply means "in exchange of more money".

eg:

I will give you 5 mangoes for each banana that you give me.

Each banana is for $1.

  • 1
    You would not say "is for," either "Each banana is $1" or "A banana for $1." I actually cannot think of a way to use each along with for in this sense, at least not in a simple sentence. – KRyan Jun 7 '15 at 15:37

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