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In my language, if you feel pain in your stomach but it automatically goes away after a while, it's a stomach ache. Maybe you ate something bad and it's not a serious problem.

However, if the pain keeps recurring, it might be a sign of a stomach-related disease. In this case, we have a general term to describe all kinds of stomach-related disease, no matter what causes it and where exactly in your stomach the problem occured.

Is there any term in English which means the same?

(I'm not sure if "stomach ache" or adding an intensifying adjective before it would describe this meaning.)

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  • As you're willing to state that it's a chronic pain in the abdominal region, (chronic abdominal pain) just say the name of the medical condition; e.g. It's my ______flaring up. Americans tend to be partial to acronyms, so IBS, IBD, CD, UC etc.
    – Mari-Lou A
    Commented Jun 13 at 8:35
  • "Chronic stomachache" isn't very precise but would be ok in casual conversation.
    – Stuart F
    Commented Jun 13 at 9:28
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    "all kinds of stomach-related disease"—this often gets the label "gastrointestinal," or "GI." If you say "I missed the party because I had a GI issue," this is understood as a euphemism that you may have been throwing up or experiencing diarrhea, or simply a stomachache. Commented Jun 13 at 17:01

3 Answers 3

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"A stomach ache" is something temporary. Below is an informal way of letting people know you have some kind of ongoing issue with your stomach, and it has arisen recently, perhaps over the past several weeks. It is very vague and inspecific.

I've been having problems with my stomach lately.

One might infer from "lately" that you haven't seen a doctor about it yet.

If it is a long-term problem and you wish to imply that you have seen a doctor, or doctors, about it, you can use the word "condition" with the simple present:

I have a stomach condition.

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  • I just edited my question to clarify what I meant. Could you reread it again? Thank you
    – Phoebe
    Commented Jun 13 at 8:49
  • When we say "I have a stomach condition", do we need to elaborate on what the condition is or something else, or only that sentence is enough? For example, I'd say "I have a stomach condition, so I'm trying to eat healthier"
    – Phoebe
    Commented Jun 13 at 9:09
  • There is no "need" to add further information. You reveal only as much as you wish to reveal. The first sentence, with "have been having problems" addresses the situation you describe in your edit.
    – TimR
    Commented Jun 13 at 9:43
  • Yes, right, a stomach condition. Best unmarked way of saying it if you want to be discrete and not tell eveyone what exactly it is that you suffer from. :)
    – Lambie
    Commented Jun 13 at 16:54
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Stomach ache adjectives

OP described two distinct types of stomach aches and desires to know the English names for each.

  1. In my language, if you feel pain in your stomach but it automatically goes away after a while, it's a stomachache. Maybe you ate something bad and it's not a serious problem.

In English, it is called an acute stomach ache. There is no need to mention 'acute'

  1. However, if the pain keeps recurring, it might be a sign of a stomach-related disease. In this case, we have a general term to describe all kinds of stomach-related disease, no matter what causes it and where exactly in your stomach the problem occured.

In English, it is called a chronic or recurring stomach ache.

It may be present all the time (chronic) or come and go (recurring).

Ref. Mayo clinic website. :

Everyone experiences abdominal pain from time to time. Other terms used to describe abdominal pain are stomachache, tummy ache, gut ache and bellyache. Abdominal pain can be mild or severe. It may be constant or come and go. Abdominal pain can be short-lived, also called acute. It also may occur over weeks, months or years, also known as chronic.

https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/abdominal-pain/basics/definition/sym-20050728#:~:text=Other%20terms%20used%20to%20describe,constant%20or%20come%20and%20go.

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As you're willing to state that you suffer from chronic pain in the abdominal region, (chronic abdominal pain) just say the name of the medical condition; e.g.

It's my ______flaring up.

to flare up means a sudden appearance or worsening of the symptoms of a disease or condition (M-W)

Americans tend to be partial to acronyms, so IBS, IBD, CD, UC etc.

To differentiate from a stomachache, you can say abdominal pain or discomfort if the pain is more manageable.

I suffer from (constant/chronic) abdominal pain.
I regularly suffer abdominal pains.

Pains suggest that you suffer from several related conditions.

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  • I just edited my question to clarify what I meant. Could you reread it again? Thank you
    – Phoebe
    Commented Jun 13 at 8:49

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