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  1. Suggesting expressions are usually expressed when a subordinate makes a proposal or suggestion to the superior, and usually with sincere expressions.

  2. Suggesting expressions are usually expressed when a subordinate makes a proposal or suggestion to the superior and, usually with sincere expressions.

And, what's the difference between the two— and following the comma in the first case, and preceding it in the latter?

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    and, is used only in this kind of construction: I went and, after the party, came back.) – user6951 Oct 10 '14 at 15:13
  • So, the second sentence should not be accepted? – Ping Tang Oct 10 '14 at 15:21
  • Neither makes easy sense to me, but the second definitely seems wrong in a more fundamental way. Can you write this as two separate sentences so I can see what this sentence is trying to more efficiently express? – Tyler James Young Oct 10 '14 at 17:02
  • For example: “Suggesting expressions are usually expressed when a subordinate makes a proposal or suggestion to the superior.” and “Suggesting expressions are usually expressed with sincere expressions.” Is that correct? If so, it might be better not to use “expressions” twice (once in a special way as part of the term you are defining and once in a generic way). If you’ve separately defined “sincere expressions”, however, this might make sense in that broader context. – Tyler James Young Oct 10 '14 at 17:07
  • Suggesting expressions are usually expressed when a subordinate makes a proposal or suggestion to the superior and, usually with sincere expressions. is "unacceptable," because we don't use and, the way you have it. – user6951 Oct 10 '14 at 18:09
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It's important to understand what the comma is actually doing here in order to know which side of the "and" it belongs on. In a sentence like this, there are only two possibilities.

1) Connecting two independent clauses with the help of a conjunction. In this case the conjunction belongs to the second clause, so the comma must come before it.

For example:

Clause 1: I couldn't see what was there.

Clause 2: I turned on the light.

Joined together: I couldn't see what was there, so I turned on the light.

2) Setting off a parenthetical element. This is an expansion of CarSmack's comment above. The commas will only be around the "extra information" in the sentence (the parenthetical element), so if "and" is part of the larger sentence you will see a comma after it. There will always be a second comma in the sentence if this is the function the first comma is serving.

For example:

Original sentence: I apologized to my father and to my mother as well.

Extra information: I was still angry at my mother.

Sentence with parenthetical element: I apologized to my father and, though I was still angry at her, to my mother as well.

I hope from these examples it's starting to become clear that in the sentence you provided there is no parenthetical element. Instead, two clauses are being joined using "and" as a conjunction.

Clause 1: Suggesting expressions are usually expressed when a subordinate makes a proposal or suggestion to the superior.

Clause 2: [Suggesting expressions are usually expressed] with sincere expressions.

Joined together: Suggesting expressions are usually expressed when a subordinate makes a proposal or suggestion to the superior, and usually with sincere expressions.

Sentence 1 is correct. Sentence 2 is not.

Note: As people in the comments have noted, the meaning of this sentence is quite confusing regardless of comma placement. It's hard to tell without context if it's actually worded poorly or if it's just a sentence that makes little sense alone.

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