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I want to introduce a work of mine, and I wrote:

  1. "I discovered a proof of a theorem. The proof, simpler than any existing ones, was published ..."

to mean,

  1. "I discovered a proof of a theorem. The proof is simpler than any existing proofs of the theorem, was published ..."

What I am not sure about is the boldfaced part. Does it mean what I intended it to mean?

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2 Answers 2

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Yes, they mean the same thing.

That said, it does read a little awkwardly; personally, I'd change it slightly, to "This proof, simpler than those currently available, was published..."

Also, it might be an idea to note how this new proof is simpler. Is it simpler to understand? Simpler to perform? Simpler to teach?

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  • I'd be partial to "simpler than prior ones" Commented Oct 14, 2014 at 4:18
  • The second one needs the word "and" added after the comma so it reads "and was published..." Commented Jan 6, 2015 at 21:17
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The bolded version is fine.  The second sentence of your second option is a bit fractured.  Even aside from Damien's suggested wordsmithing, it should be

The proof is simpler than any existing proof of the theorem; it was published ...

or

The proof is simpler than any existing proof of the theorem.  It was published ...

And (one of my pet peeves): The proof exists.  It cannot be simpler than itself.  Therefore, I believe that you should say

The proof is simpler than any other existing proof of the theorem ...

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