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"From figure 1, we can see that A is higher than B, and from the data in table 1, it could be illustrated that A is 5 times higher than B."

My gut feeling is that the "from" is naive, which I want to say that combining figure 1 and table 2, we can suggest that A is 5 times higher than B. So how to alter "from" by another conjunction phrase which could make the sentence more idiomatic?

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  • "From" is perfectly idiomatic. That said, if you're dead set on replacing it (maybe because it feels redundant with the sentence's initial from), you could also use by. – Dan Bron Oct 16 '14 at 12:35
  • But I want to use a phrase containing "combining table 1", is that possible? – Ping Tang Oct 16 '14 at 12:38
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"Simplify:

"From figure 1, we can see that A is higher than B, and the data in table 1 illustrates that A is 5 times higher than B.

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I would say:

From figure 1, we can see that A is higher than B, and using the data in table 1, it could be illustrated that A is 5 times higher than B."

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