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For the purposes of this book, I’m using two-space indents for the selector and four-space indents for the declarations. Indenting is used to provide clarity. In the real world (or your favorite text editor, to be precise), many developers use one tab click to indent the selector, and two tab clicks to indent the declarations and closing curly brace. This might seem arbitrary, but such a layout makes regular searching for rules a whole lot easier. The eye can scan immediate left for comments, next right for the selectors, and farthest right for the rules.

Are these used as adverbs? Like, you scan how? You scan left.

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  • You don't cite the source of your quote (unfortunately). That makes me wonder if these expressions might be jargon in the web layout profession.
    – J.R.
    Commented Oct 17, 2014 at 20:36
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    No, it's not jargon, just writing that imitates hasty speech. Ellipsis: (the column at the) far left, (the column at) the next (indentation), and (the column at the) far right... It's similar to the style of giving driving directions. Next light, make a left, down one block, right at the light.
    – TimR
    Commented Oct 17, 2014 at 23:02

2 Answers 2

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It doesn't sound correct to me.

This works:

The eye can scan immediate left for comments, next right for the selectors, and farthest further right for the rules.

The problem is the use of "immediate", "next", and "farthest". If you really do need such modifiers, they should be adverb + prepositional phrase:

The eye can scan immediately to the left for comments, just to the right for the selectors, and to the far right for the rules.

Another way is to treat "scan" as a transitive verb, and "left"/"right" as nouns indicating the areas being scanned, rather than indicating a relative direction.

The eye can scan the immediate left for comments, the immediate right for the selectors, and the far right for the rules.

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Yes, they're used as adverbs, modifying "scan." You are correct. "Immediate," "next" and "farthest" are also adverbs, modifying left, right, and right, respectively. He's saying you can look slightly to the left of the center of the screen to find comments. "Next right" means that you look slightly to the right of where you were looking before (for comments), and farthest right is, of course, rightwards beyond both of the other points of reference.

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