0

I have some question about the preposition "from" here:

Bradbury said Standard Parking’s subcontractor is expected to remove what’s left of the pile while cleaning up from a snowstorm that’s expected to start Wednesday.

I checked dictionaries and "from" has a lot of definitions, so I don't which one would fit here. What does "from" mean here? Maybe it is an error?

  • 1
    it could be interpreted as "cleaning up the mess left behind from a snowstorm" if that helps. But that seems a little weird in context, since it hasn't happened yet. I'd wait for a more definitive answer! – J_mie6 Oct 19 '14 at 20:13
2

It would be from sense 10:

10) because of; caused by; having the reason or motive of ⇒ "to tremble from fear"

So to paraphrase:

Bradbury said Standard Parking’s subcontractor is expected to remove what’s left of the pile while cleaning up because of/due to a snowstorm that’s expected to start Wednesday.

  • So, it is slight unusual? – meatie Oct 20 '14 at 2:35
  • 1
    @meatie No, I wouldn't say so. Pretty common phrasing. – Damien H Oct 20 '14 at 3:02
  • 1
    @meatie I would consider that a relatively normal usage. It's omitting the mess or whatever, but that's assumed (what else would you clean up?). "Clean up the mess resulting from the recent snow storm" -> "Clean up from the recent snow storm", basically. – Joe Oct 20 '14 at 3:32
  • @Joe So, it is regional dialect? – meatie Oct 20 '14 at 22:52
  • I have no idea. I've lived in three areas of the US, and it's been used in all of them, but who knows. Honestly, only a linguist would really know that - America is huge to a degree many non-Americans would have a very hard time understanding, and it's very hard to say what's regional or not. – Joe Oct 21 '14 at 0:59
0

You are right to be suspicious. As @J_mie6 points out, the time progression makes no sense. The sentence must be in error.

Based on the fact that "expected" appears twice (such repetition is poor style, but is not incorrect, per se), I would speculate that "expected to start Wednesday" was intended to refer to the cleanup, not the snowstorm. Perhaps it was carelessly edited, and was supposed to read

Bradbury said that starting Wednesday, Standard Parking’s subcontractor is expected to remove what’s left of the pile from the last snowstorm.

If that is indeed the idea that was intended to be conveyed, then the sentence published in the article is poorly phrased, to the point of being incorrect.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.