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When before sleeping if one ask me how much you drink water today. How can I respond him in better way or which one is right one?

I took 5 glass of water.

or

I take 5 glass of water today.

Because somehow I am using past sentence because I am going to sleep and right now am not drinking water.

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ARG, good question. We actually don't use take at all for liquids. We would only use the verb drink.

I drank five glasses of water today.

Similarly, we use only use the verb eat for food.

I ate five cupcakes.

But we can use the verb take for medicine.

I took five aspirin today.

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  • +1 I took five aspirin (or aspirins). Thanks for the example. You made me check the dictionary or you had me check the dictionary? Or you got me check the dictionary? I doubt the last one.
    – learner
    Oct 19 '14 at 22:42
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    @learner Make-, have-, and let-causatives use the bare infinitive, while get-causatives use the to-infinitive. In other words: "I made you do it; I had you do it; I let you do it" BUT "I got you to do it".
    – user230
    Oct 20 '14 at 7:46
  • Thank you @snailboat I got the rule right now, but which one is semantically right in the context above, made-had-let-got? If I were to use (your example) + "made me check the dictionary" I think it would be natural, but I am not sure about using the pronoun (You); it might sound rude. I mean "You made me check the dictionary etc". What would you say?
    – learner
    Oct 20 '14 at 10:53
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    @learner Do you mean that reading jonlink's answer caused you to check a dictionary? Then "You made me check a dictionary" would be most appropriate, but if you want to avoid saying you, you can avoid using a causative entirely and say "I had to check a dictionary" instead.
    – user230
    Oct 20 '14 at 18:22
  • thanks for answer and comments , but then when we can use I drunk five glasses of water today. ? Is drank and drunk make any difference ?
    – ARG
    Oct 20 '14 at 18:31

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