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I want to say that beginner moms find it difficult to remember all of the numbers related to their baby (number of kicks, diapers, feeding times and so on). Here’s what I’ve written:

The majority of beginner moms are confused about remembering all the numbers related to their baby.

Is it correct? I'm not sure about using “confused about” and verb “remember” in its -ing form.

  • What does this edit mean???? Tyler James Young? – roka114 Oct 28 '14 at 17:47
  • He is just clarifying your question and title to make it easier for us to understand what you're asking and easier for other users who might have the same type of question to find it. @TylerJamesYoung did not change the meaning at all in my opinion. – ColleenV parted ways Oct 28 '14 at 17:54
  • @ roka114: Possibly you don't have enough rep to see the comment Tyler associated with his edit, which gives descriptive title, grammar (other than grammar being asked about), clarity, other trimming as the "reason for edit". Even if none of the changes interest you, they might help other people understand the question more easily, and perhaps prevent other learners from picking up bad habits from some minor errors you made in the original text (errors that aren't relevant to the actual thing you want to know about). – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Oct 28 '14 at 17:56
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Stylistically consider using "new" rather than "beginner."
I would definitely replace "confused about" with "have difficulty."

The majority of new moms have difficulty remembering all the numbers related to their baby.

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These moms aren’t confused about remembering. They get confused when they try to remember, but the confusion is about which number is which (“confused about remembering” would mean that the concept of remembering is confusing). The way you’ve described the situation in the question is much clearer than what you’ve written in the passage, so you could just leave it as you had it there:

[Most] beginner moms find it difficult to remember all of the numbers related to their baby.

Here’s how I would combine “confused” with “remember” if you still want to do that:

Most first-time moms get confused about (when they are) trying to remember all the numbers related to their babies.

Most first-time moms get confused trying to remember all the numbers related to their babies.

The verb “remember” describes the action of recalling something more or less accurately, so we have to include something that indicates the partial failure of that action. I’ve chosen “trying”.

You may also notice that I’ve written “get” instead of “are”. This is because we are not describing a persistent state, but rather a temporary state that occurs at the moment of remembering.

“Confused” by itself means the person knowingly or unknowingly thinks the wrong numbers or no numbers at all. Since thinking of a number and remembering it are basically the same thing, we could leave out any mention of remembering and just write it this way:

Most new moms get confused about remembering all the numbers related to their babies.

Most new moms get confused about all the numbers related to their babies.

That’s fine. You could also say “confused with” to indicate not only the bare fact, but also a bit of attribution of cause (the sheer number of numbers). It’s a subtle shift that makes it seem like just about anyone would find this many numbers confusing.

Most new moms get confused with all the numbers related to their babies.

  • You are my life saver or sth like this !!!!!!! Thanks very very very much ! – roka114 Oct 28 '14 at 17:56

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