0

As I know, have been is present perfect sentence. But when I want to tell which of somewhere experience of mine, I know, I have to use 'to' at this present perfect sentence. but someone is use 'on' but I don't know what is this for usage. For example, I have been on this project 4 years ago. As I know, the on is also used in trip as verb.

so please let me know when do I use 'on' in present perfect sentence. If you don't mind , let me know what else options?

  • 2
    This is a very confused question. Prepositions do not affect the tense/aspect of a verb. "I have been on this project four years ago" is not a natural sentence. I don't see what the verb 'trip' has to do with this. Could you try to clarify your question? – tunny Oct 28 '14 at 22:52
  • @tunny : Thanks but you can check this out here ell.stackexchange.com/questions/37897/… please check steve's comment – Carter Oct 28 '14 at 22:59
  • It was pointed out in the thread you linked us to that you go 'on a trip'. That has nothing to do with whether or not the present perfect is used. – tunny Oct 28 '14 at 23:09
  • @tunny : steve leaved comments like this. None of the 3 "join project" sentences are correct. I joined this project 4 years ago. I have been on this project now for 4 years. It has been 4 years since I joined this project. I have been working on this project since 4 years ago. – Wichita Steve 4 hours ago – Carter Oct 28 '14 at 23:40
  • @tunny: he written like this, I have been on this project now for 4 years. He used what 'have been on'. I just point out this sentence. – Carter Oct 28 '14 at 23:42
1

The idea of using 'on' after 'have been' is perfectly natural.

However the sentence you have provided is grammatically incorrect -

I have been on this project 4 years ago. ('ago' is not used for the actions which are still continued in the present)

So first let's modify your sentence in the correct form.

  1. I have been on this project for the past four years.

Examples

  1. (Macmillan) The Vietnam War ended over 30 years ago.
  2. (Macmillan) It was ages ago that I saw Mick.
  3. (Cambridge) The dinosaurs died out 65 million years ago.
  4. I had seen that movie a long time ago.
  5. (Oxford) She was here just a minute ago.

'Ago' by its definition relates only to the things that happened in the past. So you would hardly or almost never find or make a sentence with the word 'ago' in any form of present of future tense.

Your example (I have been on this project 4 years ago.) is of the present tense.

In this example 'on' is short-formed for 'verb+ing' - Let's see how -

  1. I have been working on this project for the past 4 years.
  2. This project's been going on for the past 4 years.
  3. How long have you been on this project? (Asking the question by omitting the word 'working' is informal and is a less professional way. But still it is correct sentence formation)
  • Did you mean that tunny's answer is wrong? – Carter Oct 29 '14 at 7:16
  • As I know my example is present perfect. Not just present. And join's time point is past not present. If I right, I can use 'ago' in my example sentence. Am I wrong? – Carter Oct 29 '14 at 7:21
  • Certainly your sentence is present perfect. And although you joined in the past 'you are still connected and involved with that project, aren't you'? (Refer to my explanation - 'ago' is not used for the actions which are still continued in the present) So you can't use 'ago' in this example or in any other sentence where any form of present tense is invovled (present simple, present continuous or present perfect tense) – Leo Oct 29 '14 at 8:02
  • and which of tunny's answer that you refer to here ? (Is it the first comment ?) – Leo Oct 29 '14 at 8:04
  • I mean here //tunny : steve leaved comments like this. None of the 3 "join project" sentences are correct. I joined this project 4 years ago. I have been on this project now for 4 years. It has been 4 years since I joined this project. I have been working on this project since 4 years ago. – Wichita Steve 4 hours ago – user1917217 8 hours ago delete – Carter Oct 29 '14 at 8:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.