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Yes the most important thing for me is that you live happy that's it, with smiling face.

This thing matter to me a lot. Try last time, try as much as you can.

I am using comma where I naturally feel that I should stop. Second thing I am focused on not using comma after that. Am I using the right way and using it right or should I need to focus more on its way of using?

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    Hard to tell if you are using it right because there's a lot of grammatical errors. I think the right way to say what you're trying to say is: "Yes, the most important thing for me is that you live happily and that's all - living with a smiling face. This matters to me a lot. Try one last time, try as much as you can." – LawrenceC Oct 29 '14 at 19:48
  • Thank you , What's problem or mistake in using This thing matter to me a lot. – ARG Oct 29 '14 at 20:21
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    "Thing" would be used for a physical object, not for an emotional desire like "that you live happily". You can just use "This" or use "It" - "It matters to me a lot." – LawrenceC Oct 29 '14 at 20:30
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"That" is a word which is used for many different purposes. It fills a lot of different grammatical roles. Attempting to use such a broad rule as "use a comma after 'that'" will result in very poor sounding and looking sentences. In fact, I'm pretty sure (this is just an estimate) that the majority of uses of the word 'that' will not involve a comma -- like the one in this sentence.

There's a lot of errors in your sentence, unfortunately. I'll start with the usage of commas in it, so you can skip the parts that aren't related to your question specifically, if you choose.

Yes the most important thing for me is that you live happy that's it , with smiling face. This thing matter to me a lot. Try last time , try as much as you can.

The first comma between "it" and "with" is not correct. "with [a] smiling face" is a prepositional phrase. There isn't any reason to separate it from the sentence with a comma. Your second comma, between "time" and "try", is also incorrect. This is known as a "comma splice," and it's a very common and very grievous error. Comma splices are made when the author uses a comma to "splice" two sentences or complete thoughts together.

Notice that you can write "Try [one] last time." and "Try as much as you can." as separate sentences. You need a conjunction to link these sentences together, or you'll make a grammatical error. The standard conjunctions (for, and, not, but, or, yet, so) don't work here, because of the nature of the two sentences; none of the conjunction words fit in this context. Fortunately, you can use a semicolon, just like I did in the last sentence. If you're really in doubt, you can probably use a semicolon whenever you would accidentally make a comma splice (just replace the comma with the semicolon). The semicolon definitely works in this situation.

Moving on to non-comma related errors, you may have noticed that I put words in brackets ("[]") when quoting you above. I was indicating that I added that word into your statement because it would have been incorrect otherwise. You seem to have a problem with missing words. These are the two phrases which need words added to them, or they won't be grammatically correct:

with a smiling face

Try one last time

You can also rewrite these phrases ("Try again for the last time"), but I was trying to change your sentence as little as possible. Now, I'll go through each of the 3 sentences.

Yes the most important thing for me is that you live happy that's it , with smiling face.

Yes should either be removed or separated somehow. It could be its own sentence, used as a reply on its own ("Yes. The most important...").

Live happy should be live happily. "Happy"/"Happily" is describing the verb "live." You must use adverbs if you are going to describe a verb, or an adjective, or another adverb. "Happy" is an adjective, and therefore can only be used to describe nouns.

That's it, like "yes" at the start of the sentence, must be separated with some form of punctuation or transition. I'm not sure what point you're trying to get across exactly when you say "that's it," but I assume it's something along the lines of "all I care about is that you live a happy life." If that's the case, you should consider rewriting the sentence to reflect that. You can also have "that's it" be a sentence on its own; "That is it." is a complete sentence.

This thing matter to me a lot.

This thing is redundant. You have already described and established the context. If you had said "this," we would have understood that you were talking about "living happily," because there isn't anything else for it to refer to. Qualifying "this" with a noun such as "thing" or "man" is usually used when talking face-to-face, with the help of body language, so you can differentiate one object from another by gesturing to it. "This" can be used as both a noun and an adjective.

Matter must be changed to "matters." In English, you must use the proper verb form depending on whether the subject is singular or plural. Most of the time, the singular form is simply the word as shown in the dictionary with an "s" added to the end. The subject ("thing") is singular.

Try [one] last time; try as much as you can.

I have already mentioned the comma splice and the missing word, so moving on from that... there isn't anything else wrong with this sentence that I can see.

  • Answer is well explained and covers every point I wanted to learn (hope I make no mistake in that sentence :)) – ARG Oct 30 '14 at 12:45
  • No mistakes in that sentence, other than a lack of a period (which is usually forgivable online). – Crazy Eyes Oct 30 '14 at 14:36
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Most punctuation marks (that follow a word) occur immediately after the word. Do not put a space between the word and the punctuation mark that follows it.

For example, this sentence is correct. Notice that there is no space between "example" and the comma. Notice that there is no space between "correct" and the period.

For example, this sentence is correct — "m-dashes" are special. It is OK to put spaces on both sides of an extra-long dash.

Whereas , this sentence has extra spaces ; avoid doing this . Notice that the space before the comma is incorrect . Notice that the space before the semi-colon is incorrect . Notice that the spaces before the periods are incorrect .

Open quotes, open parentheses, and open brackets (like "(", "{", and "[") occur immediately before a word, not immediately after the previous word. Close quotes, close parentheses, and close brackets (like ")", "}", and "]") occur immediately after the previous word. (Sometimes another punctuation mark will be between the end of the previous word and the punctuation mark you are worried about, like in this sentence.)

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    Its difficult for me to understand your answer – ARG Oct 29 '14 at 20:34

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