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How can I convert each of these sentences into a question with the phrasal verb 'put forward' in it?

I have put forward my watch by 10 minutes.

The meeting has been put forward to Monday.

(Where the answer would be like, '10 minutes' or 'Monday' in the above examples)

Any variations of examples appreciated.

  • I have posted an answer showing how to make basic questions for these two examples. Hopefully that's ok. However, in formal writing you may want to move the whole preposition phrase to the front of the question, instead of leaving the preposition an the end :) – Araucaria - Not here any more. Nov 2 '14 at 15:51
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I have put forward my watch by 10 minutes.

The meeting has been put forward to Monday.

To convert sentences like these into questions "where the answer would be '10 minutes' or 'Monday'", we need to do the following:

First find the word which represents the unknown element ( - you can think of this as the 'interrogativized' element although this isn't a real grammatical term):

  • I have put my watch forward by (?) minutes.
  • The meeting has been put forward to (?).

Second, find the appropriate wh- word for the missing element. For numbers, we need the interrogative phrase how many. For times, days and so forth we need when:

  • I have put my watch forward by how many minutes?
  • The meeting has been put forward to when?

This gives us an in situ question. This is a perfectly acceptable question form. However, we may want to use a canonical question, where the interrogative wh- word is moved to the front of the sentence.

To do this we need a third step. Move the wh word to the front of the sentence. If it is a determiner, for example, a number, we need to move the determiner and the following noun phrase to the front:

  • [How many minutes I have put my watch forward by _____ ]
  • [When the meeting has been put forward to ____ ]

At the moment these are not proper questions yet. If we leave the sentences like this, they are not questions. They may look like exclamations:

  • Wow. How many minutes I have put my watch forward by! (Isn't it surprising!)

Because the interrogative words have moved to the front, we need to show that these are questions.The fourth step, then, is to invert the subject and the auxiliary verbs. They need to change places:

  • How many minutes have I put my watch forward by?
  • When has the meeting been put forward to?

These are now proper grammatically marked questions. Here they are without the bold:

  • How many minutes have I put my watch forward by?
  • When has the meeting been put forward to?
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How many minutes have you put forward your watch?

You have put forward your watch how many minutes?

passive:
Your watch has been put forward (by you) how many minutes?

Edit: I don't like the preposition (by) in this construction which is why none of my questions have included it. I suppose because I consider "put forward" a synonym for "advance," and I wouldn't use a preposition for How many minutes how you advanced your watch?


Until which day has the meeting been put forward?

When (/which day) has the meeting been put forward to?

To when (/which day) has the meeting been put forward?

The meeting has been put forward until when (/which day)?

The meeting has been put forward to when (/which day)?

active:
They put forward the meeting till (until) when (/which day)?

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  • Would you say this question is correct -- How long have you put forward your watch by ? – Leo Nov 2 '14 at 14:22
  • Yes, that's acceptable. But since watches are "put forward" by discreet or exact minutes or hours, using minutes or hours seems to me more likely to be used in most contexts than the open-ended how long. – user6951 Nov 2 '14 at 15:46

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