1

the context of the following text is based on two man playing cards, and a daughter's father was about to lose. my question is, what does the bolted sentences suggest? How could a father get all he lost just by back with his daughter? I guess I interpreted it wrongly; the sentences after "and would he not win, as well" are all about The Beast's fortunes, and I can't make a connection between the two.

A queen, a king, an ace. I saw them in the mirror. Oh, I know he thought he could not lose me; besides, back with me would come all he had lost, the unravelled fortunes of our family at one blow restored. And would he not win, as well, The Beast's hereditary palazzo outside the city; his immense revenues; his lands around the river; his rents, his treasure chest, his Mantegnas, his Giulio Romanos, his Cellini salt-cellars, his titles. . . the very city itself.

6

It is not explicitly stated so in the story, but the description clearly implies that The Beast has offered the narrator's father very high stakes indeed: the father stakes his daughter and The Beast stakes both everything the father has lost and all that the Beast owns, on a single hand.

Consequently, if the father wins he will have:

  • his daughter, and with her
  • "all he had lost" back, "the unravelled fortunes of our family at one blow restored", and
  • "The Beast's hereditary palazzo outside the city; his immense revenues; his lands around the river; his rents, his treasure chest, his Mantegnas, his Giulio Romanos, his Cellini salt-cellars, his titles. . . the very city itself."
3

It almost seems like that sentence (starting with "And would not he win") should be a question (though a rhetorical one). The narrator is saying that, if he is beaten in this card game, the other person would, via the win, somehow gain back all that belonged to 'The Beast'. Without knowing the story in question, I can't tell you why that would happen.

The English is rather archaic, so I'm guessing it's from an older text - would you mind giving us the name?

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