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I am confused about this question. What can I put in the blank ?

If you say the sentence must be

He would have invited you to his party last week, but he did not have your address.

then how can I say

He […] you to his party , but he had not had your address.

Are these sentence grammatically correct?

  • If I know your number , I would call you.

  • If I knew your number, I would call you.

  • If I knew your number, I would have called you.

  • If I had Known your number, I would have called you.

  • He would have invited you to his party, had he had your address. – Manish Giri Nov 4 '14 at 0:30
  • Thank you Manish! So could you explain to me the difference between them ? For example He would have invited you to his party , if he had your address and had he had your adress? – Mrt Nov 4 '14 at 0:34
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There is no good way to complete the sentence in the second block quote; the second half is flawed.

You might say

He would have invited you to his party, had he had your address.

Which has the meaning you are after. This construction states a possibility; you could replace the first instance of "had" with "if" and get a sentence with the same meaning, or you might finish with "if he had had your address."

If you wanted to keep the "not", you might write:

He would have invited you to his party, but he had not learned your address.

This mean that he has since learned your address, but did not know it at the time he was inviting people to his party.

or

Grammatically correct or not?

  1. Not correct. It would be a bit unusual, but you could say, "If I know your number, I will call you." You might say this to reassure someone who just gave you their number but is doubtful that you will call.

  2. Yes, this is grammatically correct. It means that if you are given the person's number, you will likely call them in the future.

  3. Yes, this is grammatically correct in modern English. It means that if you had been given the person's number in the past, you would have called them in the past.

  4. Yes, this is the more formal way of writing sentence 3, using the subjunctive voice.

  • Thanks Jason..very good answer but I would like tomake it clear for me.Can I ask If I knew your number, I would have called you. If I had Known your number, I would have called you. sentences have the same meaning..For example there was a party last week but at the end I could not call somebody.Both sentences mean that ? – Mrt Nov 4 '14 at 0:41
  • "If I had known your number, I would have called you." This is the formal, proper way to say this sentence. "If I knew your number, I would have called you." This is acceptable in modern (US?) English. It is how it would be said conversationally by 90% of Americans. They mean the exact same thing. – Jason Patterson Nov 4 '14 at 0:47

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