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Sentence "I am on receiving end of death" it is to mean that I am close to death, it possible any time.

Is this correct, it sounds strange a little. Can I use after "of" any verb??

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We are on or (less commonly at) the receiving end of something, usually not pleasant, such as anger or criticism, that is being directed at us by other people. We might be on the receiving end of a bullet that causes our death, but we are not on the receiving end of death. Your sentence is not natural.

  • So how am I to say that someone is "on the receiving end of death" I mean close to death. Or even that Someone caused that another person is on the receivig end of / close to death. – roka114 Nov 4 '14 at 13:28
  • roka114, you can not say so. .........receiving end of his curses, his anger, his criticism, his complaints, his firing, etc., not (his) death. – Khan Nov 4 '14 at 19:05
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All the answers so far seem to be focused on the fact that you've chosen the wrong idiom to begin with, and explaining how that idiom is used.

I'd like to suggest alternative idioms that do express what you're trying to say.

  • The plain "near death"
  • The metaphorical "at death's doorstep"
  • The more colorful "One foot in the grave and one foot on a banana peel."
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When you say that you are on the receiving end of death, it does not mean you are close to death. Nor does it make sense.

This idiom is used by someone who is the victim or target of someone else's unpleasant action such as criticism, anger, unpleasant remarks, etc. For example, I found myself on the receiving end of his anger, you will be on the receiving end of the customers' complaints, etc.

  • So how am I to say that someone is "on the receiving end of death" I mean close to death. Or even that Someone caused that another person is on the receivig end of / close to death. – roka114 Nov 4 '14 at 13:32
  • @roka114 : It's not how am I to say instead it's how am I suppose to say – EngFan Jan 24 '17 at 14:26
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The phrase “on the receiving end” needs the following in order to make sense:

  1. Bystander – someone who is hit by a thing from someone else (affected by it)
  2. Originator – some entity host to or emitting something, flinging something about
  3. Output – something (or some things) being given out by someone, e.g.:
    • stare in “I found myself on the receiving end of her icy stare.
    • punches in “Jim flailed about and his friend was on the receiving end of his wild punches.

e.g.: (1)The people of Pompeii found themselves on the receiving end of the (3)wrath of (2)Vesuvius.


These three elements can be mentioned explicitly or implied, but they have to be clear. Hearing or reading your example, people are not sure what to think. Here’s one possible interpretation:

(1)I am on the receiving end of (3)death.

  1. Bystander: “I” – the speaker
  2. Originator: ? – there is no entity mentioned or implied
  3. Output: death*

* It’s a bit odd to suggest that someone is giving someone else death. It’s not impossible, though. Here’s an example: “(2)Achilles was dealing out (3)death, and that day (1)Hector was on the receiving end.”

Here’s another:

(1)I am on the receiving end of (2)death.

  1. Bystander: “I”
  2. Originator: death (metaphorical entity)
  3. Output: ?

This phrase is probably not well suited for your purposes. It is used primarily to communicate a lack of specific, targeted intention on the part of the Originator and the bad luck of the Bystander.

You haven’t said why you want to use this phrase instead of just writing “I was close to death” or “someone put me close to death” as you have elsewhere, but in case it helps I will add that you could also write “I was in death’s reception waiting room.”

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