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If I asked my teacher a question in a classroom, then which one of the following sentence would be correct ?

  1. I put my hand up to ask the teacher a question.
  2. I raised my hand up to ask the teacher a question.

Is there any difference ? - If any, how to differentiate its usage ?

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  • 1
    there both technically the same, but raising your hand is much more common, specifically when dealing with raising your hand in order to be called on.
    – CRABOLO
    Commented Nov 5, 2014 at 4:55
  • 1
    It's in your last question should be its. You need the possessive, not the contraction of it is.
    – tunny
    Commented Nov 5, 2014 at 8:24

5 Answers 5

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I don't know if it's a British/American thing, but in my corner of Britain (Swansea), we tend to use "put your hand up" when you have a question for a teacher. I can't really comment on the usage across the rest of Britain, but "raise your hand" is something that I've only really come across in American sitcoms and films.

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  • Welcome to ELL! I think it would be better if you did an expansion to your answer. Right now it gives me the feeling that it's a comment.
    – M.A.R.
    Commented Mar 2, 2015 at 13:13
  • 2
    @MARamezani Actually, it seems to me to be a perfectly good answer. It offers an explanation for what the difference might be: AmE vs. BrE.
    – Ben Kovitz
    Commented Mar 2, 2015 at 18:09
  • they just have to always pick holes
    – Daniel
    Commented Jul 21, 2018 at 20:03
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There is a strong "British-American difference".

The Corpus of Contemporary American English contains 196 citations of raise your hand, but only 7 of put up your hand.

If you want to follow "US" style, it would be I raised my hand, not raised my hand up. If you want to follow "UK/British" style, it would be I put my hand up.

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Another difference: If a policeman was arresting a bad guy, he'd be more likely to say, "Put your hands up" than "Raise your hands".

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Raise is same as up and so "raise up your hand" in grammar is malapropism . it is therefore appropriate to say put up your hand or raise your hand.

-2

If you " put up " your hand you can " put down" your hand easily.. If you " raise your hand " still you have to " put down " your hand .

Put up your hand × put down your hand

Raise your hand × ? ( Put down your hand )(◔‿◔)

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