1

Her filling was dropped out and have to filling teeth.

Her filling was dropped out and have to place a filling.

Is "place a filling" the alternative way to say "filling teeth"?

2

Neither is correct English. You would instead say "Her filling has dropped out, and she needs a tooth filled."

2

Neither of the originals are correct.

I don't mind 'dropped out', but definitely not 'was dropped out' which is ungrammatical, however, the form I'd prefer would be...

"Her filling came out, so she needed a replacement."
or perhaps
"Her filling came out, so she needed a new one"

I prefer the second option, from J.R.'s comment, without the extra 'to get', but the first option would be my choice.

I don't like any of the constructions that link the two clauses with 'and'
'So' implies causality - because her filling came out, she needed a new one.
'And' merely strings the ideas together in the order they possibly happened.

Interestingly, you can 'replace a filling' but you really can't 'place' one.
You would 'have a tooth filled' or 'get a filling', or 'have a filling' [possibly, but that's very colloquial]

1

All the sentences seem unnatural and incorrect. I think it can be rephrased as follows:

"Her filling came out and she had to have another filling".
"Her filling came out and she had another filling".
"Her filling came out and she had the tooth filled again".

I am not sure if we can use dropped out instead of came out.

2
  • I've never heard "dropped out" in this sense in AmE. I would expect "came out" or "fell out." You might also say, "she had her filling replaced" or "she had her tooth refilled." Nov 6 '14 at 14:43
  • Or, perhaps more simply, "Her filling came out so she needed to get a new one."
    – J.R.
    Nov 7 '14 at 9:27

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