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1- I would appreciate it if someone could tell me that what the natives call the official sheet of a company, with the name and address of this company printed at the top? Please consider the following image: enter image description here

Meanwhile I would be thankful if you could let me whether the following terms are idiomatic in English or you use some other equivalents for them:

-2- Company statute

-3- Gazette (an official newspaper which contains the latest changes of the company's officials and responsible)

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    I think "official letterhead" is the usual term. – xris Nov 10 '14 at 10:02
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    1 - Letterhead [UK English] 2 - don't know 3 - Gazette, newsletter, press release. Depends on the form it takes & who it will be distributed to. – gone fishin' again. Nov 10 '14 at 10:09
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    I really don't know, sorry. I'm a retired musician - we're not really known for our business acumen ;-) – gone fishin' again. Nov 10 '14 at 10:14
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    If the person you are sending it to is then going to redistribute the information, then press release. If he's going to read it for himself, newsletter. Gazette would work, but sounds slightly more officious. – gone fishin' again. Nov 10 '14 at 10:26
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    Gazette is not standardized AmE usage here. – user6951 Nov 11 '14 at 1:48
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I would appreciate it if someone could tell me that what the natives call the official sheet of a company, with the name and address of this company printed at the top?

It's called letterhead.

Company statute

In a company's charter, the rules outlined there are called bylaws.

However, insofar as rules created by your boss and others in authority above you - which may or may not be written down - popular ones for that include policies and guidelines.

Gazette (an official newspaper which contains the latest changes of the company's officials and responsible)

Newsletter is the traditional term here and probably the most appropriate.

These days this may be done via email, if internal to the company only, and the term I've heard used is communique - though that's a generic term for any company-wide email in a pretty format.

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