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O'Sullivan & Hilliard's The Law of Contract (2018 8 ed). p. 81.

4.24. While Walford was perhaps not the best case in which to suggest that a duty to negotiate in good faith was sufficiently certain, because there were few criteria in the agreement or otherwise to help the court to define what such a duty would mean in practice, Lord Ackner’s remarks go too far in suggesting that an obligation to negotiate in good faith should never be upheld: [...]

What'd differ if in which were removed? What's the significance of in which? What are some formal terms describing this issue?

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The deictic center of that sentence is all over the place. Which entity is doing the suggesting in "in which to suggest"?

Let's rewrite it in a manner that keeps the deictic center focused.

Although a duty to negotiate in good faith is not established with certainty in Walford because there were few criteria that would have allowed a court to identify what terms of the agreement could actually have been negotiated in that case, Lord Ackner's remarks go too far in suggesting that an obligation to negotiate should never be upheld.

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