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To me, one can ("put on" or "wear") and "take off"all the mentioned items in the subject of this thread; I have made some examples. Please consider them and let me know if my sentences sound incorrect to you. Meanwhile, I think using either 'put on' or 'wear' in these senses do not make any semantic nuance in the sentences bellow; I would appreciate it if you specify the examples where using one of these two mentioned verbs convey a different connotation:

1) Hat / Cap and etc.

  • I thought its cold outside and (put on / wore) my Knit cap; but the weather was good and I (took it off / took off it).

2) Tie and so on

  • Do you know that man who has (put a tie on / put on a tie / worn a tie)?

  • Because of an old habit I (take my tie off / take off my tie) at the time of dance.

3) Glasses

  • It’s too sunny; I need to (put on / wear) my sunglasses.

  • Take of your glasses.

4) Jewels

  • Most of the women love to put on / wear expensive jewels in ceremonies

  • Please take off your jewels.

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There is always a difference between put on/take off and wear. In "It’s too sunny; I need to (put on / wear) my sunglasses", the practical result may be the same, but put on refers to a brief action and wear to a continuing state. A further difference is that both verbs can be used before the sunglasses are put on, but only wear can be used after they have been put on.

Note that you can put on sunglasses, put sunglasses on and put them on; take off sunglasses, take sunglasses off or take them off.

You cannot put on them or take off them.

  • Dear Tunny; thank you very much for being of help, but perhaps I didn't understand you well. Could you please tell me if these imperative sentences mean the same ==> (---Put your sunglasses / tie / cap etc. on = ? = Wear your sunglasses / tie / cap etc.---) => you had mentioned that: (- both verbs can be used before the sunglasses are put on, but only wear can be used after they have been put on. -) – A-friend Nov 11 '14 at 13:34
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    The practical result is the same, but they do not 'mean' the same. – tunny Nov 11 '14 at 13:37
  • Does that mean that they can always be swapped? :-) – A-friend Nov 11 '14 at 13:48
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    @A-friend: No. Compare "He was wearing a hat when I saw him" and "He was putting on a hat when I saw him". The speaker observed a state in the first sentence, an action in the second. – tunny Nov 11 '14 at 13:51
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There is a difference between "put on" and "wearing". "putting on" is the act of changing from "not wearing to "wearing". In the same way "taking off" is changing from "wearing" to "not wearing".

However, they are often used interchangeably, because they imply each other. If I have put on a tie, then it can imply that I am wearing it now. If I am wearing a hat, it implies I put it on at some point in the past.

In your examples, the sentences all work either way, but there may be subtle differences in meaning. "Women who love to put on jewels" is slightly different from "women who love to wear jewels" because in the first case it suggest that it is the act of putting the jewels on that they enjoy, and in the second case it suggests that they enjoy the wearing.

  • Biglig, than you for your attention, but I do not understand you well when you say: (- They are often used interchangeably, because hey imply each other. -) which is contrary to what you said before that: (- There is a difference between "put on" and "wearing". "putting on" is the act of changing from "not wearing to "wearing". In the same way "taking off" is changing from "wearing" to "not wearing". -)! Perhaps you mean though they convey different messages, but whereas the meanings are too close, one can swap them with each other before the piece of clothing is on someone's body. Right? :-) – A-friend Nov 11 '14 at 13:40
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    @A-friend What he means is that when I say, "This morning I put on my pants," you know that there was a brief period of during which I went from wearing no pants to wearing pants. After that point in time it is implied that I continued to wear my pants. Another example: My daughter wants to go outside and play, but it's cold. I tell her, "Put on your coat!" or "Wear your coat!" What I mean is, "Put on your coat before you go outside." or "Wear your coat while you are outside." Both sentences have the same basic meaning and effect. – Jason Patterson Nov 11 '14 at 14:40
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The difference is that put on/off implies the movement action of removing and putting something on yourself, while "wearing" dies not indicate movement.

Example: I put on the hat 5 minutes ago. I am wearing a hat. I will take off the hat later.

(Something similar happens in german, but that is a tale for another day)

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