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I was reading an article about tablets , I came across this sentence ( highlighted one) which I am not sure I could understand it ..Because for me its meaning contradicts the rest of the article..What I understood is that " tablets beat other form of computers in terms of sales or functionality but tablets are seen the demise of e-readeas" .So if we use tables to read e-books , doesn't the word " demise" contradic the rest of the sentence?Can you explain what it means .In this context the word suggest means "show , indicate "..?

"More and more people are choosing tablet computers as their weapon of choice for e-mail, surfing the net, watching videos, keeping up with social networking, playing games and whatever else they do, both for fun and for work. Tablets will outsell both desktops and laptops combined in 2014 and, as you can see from the list of activities (which is incomplete), their versatility is definitely one of the major appeals of these devices.

In addition to outgunning other types of computers, tablets are often suggested to herald the demise of dedicated e-readers. Some potential buyers, ask “which is the best tablet for reading books on?”."

Thanks

  • You can read "to herald the demise of" as "to announce the death of". – Damkerng T. Nov 11 '14 at 16:13
  • well actually this the part I was able to understand..If tablets' sales have been rising and people use it for e-reading what it is called something of DEATH or DEMISIH..do you think does the whole paragraph make a sense – Mrt Nov 11 '14 at 16:18
  • I read it okay, because the two paragraphs are not quite directly related. The first talks about tablets. Then the second relates the tablets to e-readers, which are usually thought of as already dead, and the growing market of tablets is often used to confirm the death of e-readers, according to the writer of the article. – Damkerng T. Nov 11 '14 at 16:24
  • Sorry I meant " well actually this is the part I was not able to understand" I think I figured out..I think the writer doesn't consider kindle as a tablet and compares kindle which is used by "dedicated e-readers " and tablets which is used relatively more than reading a book.. – Mrt Nov 11 '14 at 16:31
  • Yes, you got it right. I got one old Kindle, and a couple of e-readers from other brands. I definitely don't call them tablets. – Damkerng T. Nov 11 '14 at 16:35
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In addition to outgunning other types of computers, tablets are often suggested to herald the demise of dedicated e-readers.

The section:

  • tablets are often suggested to herald the demise of dedicated e-readers.

is another way of saying:

  • people often suggest that tablets herald the demise of dedicated e-readers.

Suggest in this sentence is just a more interesting way to write say. The Original Poster says:

What I understood is that tablets beat other form of computers in terms of sales or functionality but tablets are seen the demise of e-readers.

This is ninety-nine percent accurate. The OP then asks whether the sentence is contradictory. The answer is that the OP's version is contradictory, but the original isn't. That 1% which the Original Poster didn't include in their sentence is the word dedicated. It is the word dedicated which helps the sentence make sense.

We sometimes use the word dedicated to show that something has only one purpose or one usage. For example, I'm a veggie, and in our kitchen we have a dedicated vegetarian frying pan. This means that this pan can only be used to cook vegetarian food. No dead bodies allowed in this pan!

So a dedicated e-reader is an electronic device that is only used for reading. So, on a dedicated e-reader you can't do anything else - just read. I think the author is saying that tablets are going to cause the death of the dedicated e-reader, because it is more convenient to be able to read your books and do your emails, and read posts on ELL, just using one machine.

Hope this is helpful!

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    Thank you so much for your comprensive and clear answer!Well I thought the same way just after I had written my last message on this thread and I happy that I got it right.. – Mrt Nov 11 '14 at 17:48
  • I'm not so sure about suggest in this sentence is just a more interesting way to write say. I think it's an appalling misuse of the verb which reflects badly on the linguistic competence of the writer. Looking at more of his text, I'm not about to change my opinion on that front. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Nov 11 '14 at 18:29
  • @FumbleFingers But that doesn't seem to be the same text/writer at all! Here's the source of that quote – Araucaria - Not here any more. Nov 11 '14 at 19:49
  • How odd! Google returns a total of 18 instances of "tablets are often suggested", about half are duplicates of either my link or yours. Your writer seems otherwise literate, and the precise context isn't quite as bad as the one I found. But I still think it's at the very least an unusual/clumsy usage. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Nov 12 '14 at 13:22

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