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"The task of science,as we know , is to discover facts; but a haphazard collection of facts cannot ______________________ a science "

According to my test book, the answer for the blank is that " be said to constitute " but there was another option on the answers of the question which is " be said that it constitutes "

So I would like to ask why can't we say that

"The task of science,as we know , is to discover facts; but a haphazard collection of facts cannot be said that it constitutes a science " Does it make a sense in this way?

Thanks

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The other option is not possible. Let's look at a simpler example to see why.

People say that he drinks.

It is said that he drinks.

He is said to drink.

(*)He is said that he drinks.

It should be clear that the fourth example is not possible. Now let's look at your sentences in the same way.

We cannot say that a haphazard collection of facts constitutes a science.

It cannot be said that a haphazard collection of facts constitutes a science.

A haphazard collection of facts cannot be said to constitute a science.

(*)A haphazard collection of facts cannot be said that it constitutes a science.

Can you see now why the fourth one is not possible?

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  • Thank you a lot.I think it seems to has something to do with a passive form sentence structure which I noticed I hadnt given attention before – Mrt Nov 11 '14 at 21:06

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