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I have not eaten macaroons in a long time.

It has been quite a long time since I've eaten macaroons.

I haven been a long time no eaten macaroons.

Which is the colloquial way to say?

2 Answers 2

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I have not eaten macaroons in a long time.

My preferred form.

It has been quite a long time since I've eaten macaroons.

I would remove the plural from this second one & recast it as

It has been quite a long time since I ate a macaroon

which would then make it quite OK.

This last one makes no sense at all

I haven been a long time no eaten macaroons.

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  • +1 You could also have I've gone a long time now without having a macaroon Nov 15, 2014 at 20:43
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    As for #2, I'd use a contraction and omit the quite, i.e.: It's been a long time since I've had a macaroon.
    – J.R.
    Nov 16, 2014 at 0:13
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    Or in teen-speak: I haven't had a macaroon in, like, forever.
    – Jim
    Nov 16, 2014 at 2:21
  • "I've not had one for yonks" ;-) Nov 16, 2014 at 8:02
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In England you would probably hear:

'I haven't had macaroons in ages.' or: 'I've not had macaroons in ages.'
'It's been ages since I've had macaroons.'

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  • You'd also hear 'for ages' in the first two.
    – tunny
    Nov 15, 2014 at 19:58

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