0

The announcement that Canberra-based Aspen Medical will step into the front line of Australia's response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has been widely welcomed.
The health provider will get $20 million from the Abbott Government to staff a 100 bed hospital in Sierra Leone.
Australia is now spending over $40 million to combat the deadly virus, but it hasn't silenced the critics, who say the response has been underdone and tardy, or hushed calls to send the military.
The plan comes with a guarantee that Britain will treat any volunteers who get sick. But as political correspondent Louise Yaxley reports, the European Union gave a similar guarantee last month.
(Aussie ABC)

Before the boldfaced part, is there an omission: ‘the response has been’?

1
  • 3
    Remember, the relative clause can be removed without changing the meaning. So if you remove who say the response has been underdone and tardy, the parallelism of two participles separated by or becomes plainer.
    – user6951
    Nov 19, 2014 at 4:30

3 Answers 3

3

No omission.

The sentence construction is ambiguous. The structure could be broken apart this way:

The expenditures haven't silenced critics, who say the response has been underdone and tardy.
The expenditures also haven't silenced hushed calls to send the military.

Where hushed is an adjective modifying the calls. (Despite money spent, some people are suggesting semi-publicly that perhaps the army should be sent.)

Or this way

The expenditures haven't silenced critics, who say the response has been underdone and tardy.
The expenditures also haven't hushed (quieted) calls to send the military.

Where hushed is averb. (Despite money spent, some people are still calling out that the army should be sent.)

Either way there is no omission. The second case is more likely.

The ambiguity could be have been prevented with

The expenditures have neither silenced critics, who say the response has been underdone and tardy, nor hushed calls to send the military.

3
  • Thank you for accepting my answer. @user3169 raises a good point about potential ambiguity in another answer, and it is worth a read.
    – Adam
    Nov 19, 2014 at 5:30
  • 2
    -1, sorry. It's not that the calls to send the military are hushed, and that the $40m haven't silenced these calls; rather, it's that the $40m hasn't "hushed" (=silenced) the calls to send the military.
    – ruakh
    Nov 19, 2014 at 8:09
  • +1 to your comment @ruakh. My original answer completely overlooked that possibility. I have made significant edits to improve the answer, since it has already been accepted and I can't delete it.
    – Adam
    Nov 19, 2014 at 15:14
10

Australia is now spending over $40 million to combat the deadly virus, but it hasn't silenced the critics, who say the response has been underdone and tardy, or hushed calls to send the military.

The money hasn't
- silenced the critics who say the response has been underdone and tardy
- or hushed calls to send the military

"hushed" here is somewhat odd - it's being used to say "the money spent hasn't quieted calls to send the military".

Seems complete to me.

2
  • 2
    Well despite 9 upvotes the only correct answer has still not been chosen...
    – user6951
    Nov 19, 2014 at 16:40
  • @CarSmack Well that's the beauty of the system :) The asker can choose the answer that best suits them and the community can still indicate which answers they think are good ones.
    – ColleenV
    Nov 19, 2014 at 17:16
0

There is no omission in the construction of this setencce. I think it's is a nicely phrased sentence, in which the conjunction "or" has been used in a way that isn't very common. "Or" is used in different senses, one of which is that it's used to introduce a word or phrase that means the same as you have just said. (Pls see Oxford Learners for "or").

"......who say the response has been underdone and tardy, or hushed calls to send the military". The past participle "hushed" has been used as an adjective. If we read this phrase in light of the sense of "or" as mentioned above, it will mean as follows:

"........who say the response has been underdone and tardy, which is tantamount to/means the same as hushed calls to send the military. (Pls look up the adj hushed in Oxford Learners, which means (of voices, conversation) speaking quietly). Critics are still demanding quietly to send the military.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .