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I have come across the following sentence : 'There is a general rise in prices such as occurred in the late 60's'. I would like to know whether the word 'as' is functioned as a conjunction or relative pronoun.

Is the word 'such' an adjective modifying the word 'prices'? if so, can i put 'such' in front of 'prices'?

One more example: 'As can be imagined, estimating the value of properties on a regular basis can be a large task' Is the word 'as' a relative pronoun or conjunction?

Thank you

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There is a general rise in prices such as occurred in the late 60's

This is a run on sentence. It should be

There is a general rise in prices, such as occurred in the late 60's

As is the relative pronoun that introduces the phrase occurred in the late 60's. Such is a pronoun whose antecedent is rise (or general rise in prices).

It's odd, but not incorrect AFAIK to actually start a new sentence with such though, instead of setting it off with a comma, because it's heavily dependent on a preceding sentence.

Of course, it's probably easier/more correct to just remember that such as is an idiom, and is equivalent to for example.

There is a general rise in prices for example as occurred in the late 60's

Still really need that comma, though.

There is a general rise in prices, for example as occurred in the late 60's.

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    "As is the relative pronoun" <== Could you provide a grammar source for that? (I've run into people saying something like that, and I'm curious as to where they might be getting that kind of information.)
    – F.E.
    Nov 19, 2014 at 22:02
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  • Pronominal as is an intriguing treatment, which I will have to think about. But if we do accept it, the comma should be omitted if the relative clause is intended to bear a restrictive sense = just such a general rise in prices as occurred in the late 60s. Nov 20, 2014 at 0:07
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    Thank you. :) -- So the culprit seems to mostly be dictionaries. Interestingly, there is a bit on a "relative 'as'" in the 1985 Quirk et al., section 15.55, pages 1115-7, too. Though, it's my impression that the typical modern grammars nowadays probably don't consider "as" as a relative pronoun (anymore), e.g. the 2002 reference grammar by Huddleston and Pullum et al., CGEL (where many "as" uses are involved in comparative constructions where "as" is considered a preposition). Interesting.
    – F.E.
    Nov 20, 2014 at 2:30

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