4

Is there any difference between these two sentences or is one of them just wrong?

If we won't remember anything then it will just be as if we hadn't been together.

and

If we won't remember anything then it will just be as if we haven't been together.

  • Both would be understood. My US English ear prefers "hadn't" to "haven't" there. I find that those (US) speakers who do use the present tense there will compensate by intoning the statement differently to express its counterfactuality. Either "been" or "together" will receive an emphasis. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 21 '14 at 13:32
2

The first one is ok if we change the positions of just and be:

If we won't remember anything then it will be just as if we hadn't been together.

I think it is most likely that we mean had never been together. Finally, most good writers would place a comma before the word then:

If we won't remember anything, then it will be just as if we had never been together.

The second sentence is wrong.

We use won't and hadn't been in this sentence to give information about time. The won't part says that the speaker or writer is imagining theirself in the future. The hadn't been means that the speaker is looking backwards from the future into something that happened (being together) and then finished before something else happened.

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Both sentences are just horrible!

"If we will not remember anything then it will just be as if we had not been together". The "will" suggest voluntary action which makes no sense in this regard; nor does it fit the promissory descriptor.

The sentence should be written "if we do not (don't)"... @Jim is correct in stating that the positions of just and be should be changed... in fact I would drop the "just" altogether as it is unnecessary verbiage.

So to answer your question - both are wrong. The sentence should be:

"If we don't remember anything then it will be as if we hadn't been together".

http://www.englishpage.com/verbpage/simplefuture.html http://grammar.about.com/od/basicsentencegrammar/a/prperfectense.htm

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