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When you create more complex Web applications, it’s generally a good idea to have a design of some kind in mind, rather than just attacking the problem using brute force. In addition to making sure that things work, period, the most important consideration when you’re building applications is making sure that they’re easy to maintain. There’s nothing worse than going back and looking at an application a few months after it was written and realizing that you have no idea how it works.

I don't understand what the word period means in that sentence.

  • The "period" ends the sentence (literally), and therefore also the discussion (metaphorically). So, the idiom means the same thing as "no ifs, ands, or buts". The speaker wants you to get it working, and does not want to hear a bunch of reasons or excuses later for why you couldn't. – Dan Bron Nov 24 '14 at 23:51
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    period 2a. "used for emphasis to show that there is no more to be said about something". – Damkerng T. Nov 25 '14 at 2:03
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'Period' is an alternate name for a full stop - the punctuation mark that is used to end a sentence.

When either one is used in that manner, it functions as an intensifier by implying that the idea that came immediately before it captures all of the most important concepts by itself. There might be other factors that are worth remembering - in fact, this particular excerpt is mostly about a completely different concept - but they are secondary considerations.

In this case, 'making sure things work, period' means that the web application must work. If it doesn't there are no excuses, no mitigating circumstances - even if it's the most beautiful, efficient, elegantly-designed web application ever, it's a failure if it doesn't do what it was designed to.

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The word period (mainly used in the US English) means the discussion is over and you emphasize that what you said is final (from your side)

However, I'm not sure whether the placement of the word 'period' looks natural in the sentence in concern.

Cambridge Dictionary defines it:

[mainly US] said at the end of a statement to show that you believe you have said all there is to say on a subject and you are not going to discuss it any more

The example follows:

here will be no more shouting, period!

Even I speak that word in the recommended way, at the end of the sentence meaning final (at least from my side).

But here, the sentence has period in the middle of the sentence, which makes less sense to me. I had hard time finding such example sentence from standard sources. I'll be happy to see if someone comes up.

If you ask me, I'd suggest 'comma' there over a 'period'.

In addition to making sure that things work, the most important consideration when you’re building applications is making sure that they’re easy to maintain.

over

In addition to making sure that things work, period, the most important consideration when you’re building applications is making sure that they’re easy to maintain.

In fact, this is really a strange usage of period word (in between commas) I've ever seen! :)

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Period = "full stop". End of sentence. That is, the statement, if ended there, captures the essential idea.

  • But the sentence does not end there. – Maulik V Nov 25 '14 at 4:47
  • Much virtue in if. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Nov 25 '14 at 12:25

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