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I have recently run into this sentence:

Modularity principle is at the heart of DorsaLista design. Due to this, concept of a Module is worth revisiting. Been a common term it used in multiple ways which makes misunderstanding almost unavoidable as a result of its meaning assumptions.

Can someone explain to me how this sentence is constructed ? I've never seen such a thing in english.

Regards, Nicolas

Edit: Adding the beginning.

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    It's an odd sentence. Maybe, there are a few fragments in the text you quoted there. It'd be helpful if you can give us the source of the text (such as the webpage you got the text from). Commented Nov 26, 2014 at 14:19
  • It seems like a bad translation to me because it's missing articles (the concept of a module) and the verb tense is wrong ("Been" should be "Being") and there is missing punctuation. We really need a link to the source assuming this isn't really just a request for proofreading.
    – ColleenV
    Commented Nov 26, 2014 at 14:28
  • I'd have thought 'being' .. I'd also desperately need to insert an 'is' before 'used'. Commented Nov 26, 2014 at 14:34
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    You still have not seen such a thing in English! Commented Nov 26, 2014 at 14:48

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As others have noted, the text is not proper English. The most confusing part is in the end, "a result of its meaning assumptions"; If I interpret meaning assumptions very liberally as "assumptions about its meaning", the sentence would, in plain English, read something like this:

The modularity principle is at the heart of DorsaLista design. Because of this, the concept of a module is worth revisiting. Being a common term, it is used in multiple ways. This makes misunderstanding it almost unavoidable as a result of assumptions about its meaning.

I think this little rewrite should make the meaning a lot clearer.

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