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Is there a single word for "able to be expensed"? Expensable and expensible do not appear to be in any dictionary I've seen, but I'd swear I've seen them used.

  • The word claimable might work. – J.R. Mar 16 '13 at 10:52
7

In US English, I've seen the term reimbursable used for a business expense for which your employer will repay you at a later date.

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  • It's already implied in this answer, but I'd like to note explicitly that reimbursable refers to a wholly contained subset of expensable items. There may be a one-to-one correlation depending on the workplace (i.e. everything expensable is reimbursable), but there are useful distinctions between the two words in terms of specificity and implied outcome. – Tyler James Young Nov 28 '17 at 17:42
3

“Expensable” is the right word. Here it is in eHow’s definition of expense reports:

Meals and entertainment are often expensable costs
Source: eHow, What Is the Definition of an Expense Report?

Here it is in a Wikipedia article on Capital expenditure:

Most ordinary business expenses are clearly either expensable or capitalizable
Source: Wikipedia, Capital expenditure

It’s formed by adding the highly productive suffix “-able” (meaning fit for) to the verb “expense”.

-able

  1. a suffix meaning “capable of, susceptible of, fit for, tending to, given to,” associated in meaning with the word able, occurring in loanwords from Latin (laudable); used in English as a highly productive suffix to form adjectives by addition to stems of any origin (teachable; photographable).

Source: dictionary.com definition of -able

I hear this word used all the time in my office (in Chicago). Dictionaries don’t always list every adjective that gets formed like this.

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-1

How about consumable or simply usable?

Are you sure what you saw was not expansible? Which looks very alike, but means "able to be expanded."

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