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How would be the following idea expressed in more fluent and idiomatic English?

I think that in the film is some similarity with our real world but with hyperbole, sure.

It is somebody defending Hunger Games by pointing out that even though the story might be dismissed by some as a pile of nonsense, it is actually centered around valuable things like love, friendship, family relationships and it even touches some social issues. Well, I think that is the intention.

There is a lot of thinks to thinking about in this movie. I think that there is some similarity with our world but with hyperbole sure.

Correcting the first sentence is easy. I am having trouble with the second.

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    What's the reference? The initial sentence, even with fixes in the answers below, sounds like someone trying to sound well-educated, yet hip & cool at the same time [& failing]. I hope it's from speech, not from written English. Nov 29, 2014 at 21:17
  • @Tetsujin I'll add that to the question.
    – user7610
    Nov 30, 2014 at 12:16
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    The additional context make it look more like an amateur reviewer with little command of the English language, looking things up in a dictionary; or an illiterate native. Do you have a link to it? Nov 30, 2014 at 12:27
  • @Tetsujin You are spot on in your assessment. I can't give you the link. But I can paste the whole thing here: Hi girls :) I saw this movie and I enjoyed it :) I think it's good to separate it to two parts because you can be looking forward to the second part and you can think about what can happen on the end. There is a lot of thinks to thinking about in this movie. I think that there is some similarity with our world but with hyperbole sure.
    – user7610
    Nov 30, 2014 at 12:32
  • then my last comment still stands Nov 30, 2014 at 12:34

3 Answers 3

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I would prefer:

I think that in the film there is some similarity with our real world, but with hyperbole for sure.

for sure as used here is an idomatic phrase. See for sure.

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There are numerous ways to say that. You can simply say: "There is some exaggeration in the film (compared to real life)" because hyperbole means exaggeration. Or "I think the film is somewhat similar to our real world except with some hyperbole"

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  • You seem to have dropped the "sure" at the end. Can I say "I think the film is somewhat similar to our real world except with some hyperbole, obviously"
    – user7610
    Nov 29, 2014 at 18:14
  • @user7610 Yes, 'obviously' looks okay.
    – user6200
    Nov 29, 2014 at 18:59
  • @user7610 Also, the sentence is fine without 'sure'. It will be understood.
    – user6200
    Nov 29, 2014 at 19:02
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Why don't you try:

I believe/think that the film shares some similarities with our [current] world[state], albeit exaggerated.

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    Please include an explanation of why this is more fluent; answers without explanation are not as helpful in teaching the rules of the language. Aug 11, 2015 at 18:38

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