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For example in this sentence:

And don't worry if you've never played the sport. That experience might help, but it's not necessary. As long as you know the rules and can do the job, you can be a referee!

Can "provided" ,or "supposing" also be used to take place of "if"?

Are “if”,“provided”, and “supposing” interchangeable in such conditional sentences? Are there any rule about using them?

Detailed explanation would be appreciated.

closed as off-topic by user3169, Em1, Chenmunka, ColleenV, starsplusplus Dec 1 '14 at 15:15

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    I don't exactly know why, but I just don't think "And don't worry provided you've never played the sport" is a good sentence. – dennylv Dec 1 '14 at 6:57
  • Imho, I think it sounds wrong because it's in conflict with common knowledge. And we usually assume a typical context. This might sound better, "And don't worry, provided you know how to play the sport." – Damkerng T. Dec 1 '14 at 7:11
  • still confusing... – dennylv Dec 1 '14 at 7:18
  • It has been edited. I think it's on-topic now. – dennylv Dec 4 '14 at 3:02
  • I think this question is still off-topic: it reflects no additional research, the additional clauses don't illuminate the seemingly random words you've suggested as possible substitutes. The existing answers ignore the fact that if is a conjunction and supposing and provided are verbs. They fulfill different roles and require different syntax. – jimsug Dec 4 '14 at 14:32
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They are entirely different!

And don't worry if you've never played the sport = If you have never played the sport, it's okay. Do not worry about it

Now you want to replace if with provided

And don't worry provided you've never played the sport - sounds off to me looking at the original sentence and its purpose.

provided in such context means on condition. I'd be happy if you explain what makes you think them all interchangeable!

"I'll go provided that I can wear what I like" = If you want me to go, I'll wear what I want. Or else, I'm not interested.

Now,

And don't worry supposing you've never played the sport -again sounds off to me looking at the original sentence and its purpose.

supposing means a hypothetical thought. On the assumption that...

supposing I did agree with you

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As it seems you know, all three terms can be used to form conditional sentences. They cannot all be simply interchanged, no. Take a look at dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/conditionals-other-expressions-unless-should-as-long-as

It treats all of those terms at least to some extent.

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