1

Is there any difference in terms of meaning?

  • Hey, have you heard? Famous chain kebab shop has launched a new branch in the town. The restaurant itself is pretty big and the prices are 50% off for today. So I am going to try it out today.

  • Hey, have you heard? Famous chain kebab shop has launched a new branch in the town. The restaurant itself is pretty big and the prices are 50% off for today. So I am going to check it out today

  • Hey, have you heard? Famous chain kebab shop has launched a new branch in the town. The restaurant itself is pretty big and the prices are 50% off for today. So I am going to try it today

I think this example sentence a "meeting point" for try out and check out in this sense


I would like to ask you to check my other sentences if they are ok in this sense

Situation 1:

A: I think I have lost my car key.I have been looking for it for 15 minutes but I can't find yet.

B : Have you checked out your hand bag ? or Have you checked your hand bag?

B : Have you looked into your hand bag? ( if it has the same meaning)

Sitaution 2:

I have sent you a mail with an attachemnt in which there is quate we will send to X firm.

  • Could you check your mail(s) urgently
  • Could you check out your mail(s) ?
  • Could you check out your mail box?
  • Could you check your mail box?

Thanks in advance!

3

Checking something out can mean "taking a look at something" when used colloquially. So with the first three sentences, checking out does not necessarily mean that you're going to eat there.

If you say "I am going to check that restaurant out" it can both mean "I am going to read something about them, get myself informed" or "I'm going there to try their food". However it usually means the latter, but that's not a rule.

Try out / try is fairly interchangeable in your example sentences, although it sounds better without the "out" to my ears.

Situation 1:

You would say "Have you checked your bag?", not "Have you checked out your bag?".

And yes, that's another way of saying "Have you looked in your bag?"

Situation 2:

"Could you check your inbox?" is colloquial but it would work. As would "Could you [please] check your email [as soon as possible]?". The word "mailbox" however can't really be used when talking about an email as that word is commonly used to refer to a physical mailbox (The one in front of your house).

  • Good answer. But you can have a physical inbox and outbox on your physical desk. I would guess the uses for computer (virtual) inbox and outbox are taken from these. By analogy, you can have a virtual mailbox in addition to a physical mailbox. Indeed, some programs refer to a virtual mailbox. – user6951 Dec 3 '14 at 23:30
  • But you need to make a distinction from the regular use of the word by adding "virtual". Just plain "mailbox" makes me think of a physical mailbox, not an email inbox. And just out of pure curiosity, which programs refer to a "virtual inbox"? I've never seen that term being used and I have used quite a few email clients etc. – J_LV Dec 3 '14 at 23:42

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