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Example:

To work through this book in its entirety, you should have access to a computer with Microsoft Access installed. The programs in this book were written in Microsoft Office 2007, specifically Access 2007. Those readers using older versions of Microsoft Access, such as Access 2002 or Access 2003, will find many of the VBA programming concepts still apply.

Is this arrangement of words typical as a grammatical construction in English? So, could I, for example, say something like this using this construction: you will find many mathematical concepts developed as long as 600 years ago still apply for a great multitude of modern-day technology-related problems?

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Those readers using older versions of Microsoft Access, such as Access 2002 or Access 2003, will find (that) many of the VBA programming concepts still apply.

Here, we have a noun clause in which there's no that: it is omitted. For my taste, the clause it a bit too long for the omission of that.

You felt the same, I guess, and came up with a sentence with a bigger that-clause:

You will find (that) many mathematical concepts developed as long as 600 years ago still apply for a great multitude of modern-day technology-related problems.

A clause of this size looks unwieldy without its that, despite being grammatical.

My guess it that probably that is omitted in speech even with long noun clauses, when a person is speaking fast. There might be a way to indicate by pronunciation the right parsing of clauses during speech.

With a written text, it's not so. Many a non-native speaker will discover a written text is less clear this way.

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    Yes. One would pause to demarcate developed as long as 600 years ago and emphasize still apply. The entire clause many...still apply can be processed as the object of find, understanding "find" as "find this to be true:". And the final clause, "for a great multitude..." can be processed as an afterthought to the main idea. Dec 6 '14 at 13:12

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